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The Simplicity of Ice Cream


IM4given

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Just kidding, I have been offered to share a banana split, I say NO!, I want my own. :hungry:
Hold the nuts, extra chocolate....... :drool


You don't want to share your banana split? The bible says to love your neighbour as yourself, so that would mean to share. :Green
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I'm with you BTGS! Except make my banana split with a triple topping of hot fudge, with cream and cinnamon sticks on top! Hold the sprinkles!

Maddy, you'll have to go get your own, because I ain't sharin' mine neither! :lol:

Banansplit-sm.jpg

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I am ready now, I just ate 2 turkey sanners ans now I want Ice Cream.......
I do not have an Ice Cream Maker, we had one 150 years ago, it died.
Well the sun is out, I must needs go, and maybe I will find Ice Cream and Chocolate cake somewhere. :hungry:
I could hit 300lbs just reading IM4's posts. :java:


I would name the bottom one, "The Titanic" I would sink that bad boy.

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I must correct my original post regarding the historical inventioin of Ice Cream - My Exegesis was faulty - I gave credit to the Arabs for the invention of Ice Cream, when it would appear from the historical documents that I have read of late that Ice Cream was actually served by the early Roman Emperors...


The Evolution of Ice Cream
Ice cream's origins are known to reach back as far as the second century B.C., although no specific date of origin nor inventor has been undisputably credited with its discovery. We know that Alexander the Great enjoyed snow and ice flavored with honey and nectar. Biblical references also show that King Solomon was fond of iced drinks during harvesting. During the Roman Empire, Nero Claudius Caesar (A.D. 54-86) frequently sent runners into the mountains for snow, which was then flavored with fruits and juices.

Over a thousand years later, Marco Polo returned to Italy from the Far East with a recipe that closely resembled what is now called sherbet. Historians estimate that this recipe evolved into ice cream sometime in the 16th century. England seems to have discovered ice cream at the same time, or perhaps even earlier than the Italians. "Cream Ice," as it was called, appeared regularly at the table of Charles I during the 17th century. France was introduced to similar frozen desserts in 1553 by the Italian Catherine de Medici when she became the wife of Henry II of France. It wasn't until 1660 that ice cream was made available to the general public. The Sicilian Procopio introduced a recipe blending milk, cream, butter and eggs at Café Procope, the first café in Paris.

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"John81
Post subject: Re: Questions Only
New postPosted: Sat Feb 24, 2007 5:10 pm
Anyone remember, "I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream!"??? :drool

_________________
In Christ,
John"

Quoting john81 from another post.

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Hebrew words needed to order ice cream:
The word for icecream is Glee-tah.
The word for cup is -cos (with a long o sound.)
The word for little is kah-tan.
The word for big is gah-dol (with a long o sound.)
The word for cone is charot (with a long o sound.)
The word for one when ordering is eh-chad.
The word for two when ordering is shtay.
The word for half is chetz-ee.

Greek words needed to order ice cream:
The word for icecream is pagoto
The word for cup is flitzani, kypello
The word for little is mikros, ligos.
The word for big is megalos
The word for cone is konos
The word for one when ordering is enas, mia, ena
The word for two when ordering is dyo
The word for half is misos

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Here is the historical background for Ice Cream Cones. It will make every cone that you eat from this point forward taste even better than ever before!

There is much controversy over who invented the first ice cream cone. From my research, I feel that the first cones were not invented in the United States. Both paper and metal cones were used in France, England, and Germany before the 19th century. Travelers to Düsseldorf, Germany reported eating ice cream out of edible cones in the late 1800s.

Before the invention of the cone, ice cream was either licked out of a small glass (a penny lick, penny cone, penny sucker, or licking glasses) or taken away wrapped in paper which was called a "hokey pokey." The customer would lick the ice cream off the dish and return the dish to the vender, who washed it and filled it for the next customer. As you can guess, sanitation was a problem. An even bigger problem was that the ice cream vender couldn't wash the dishes fast enough to keep up with demand on a hot day.

Ice cream in a cup also became known as a "toot," which many have been derived from the Italian word "tutti" or "all," as customers were urged to "Eat it all." They were also known as "wafers," "oublies," "plaisirs," "gaufres," "cialde," "cornets," and "cornucopias."


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Wafers, Cornucopias and Cornets

1700s - During the 1770s, ice cream was referred to as "iced puddings" or "ice cream puddings." The cones used were referred to as wafers. During this period, wafers were considered as "stomach settlers" and were served at the end to the meal to calm digestion. They eventually became luxurious treats and were an important element of the dessert course. When rolled into "funnels" or "cornucopias," they could be filled with all sort of fruit pastes, creams, and iced puddings.

1770 - From the article, Wafer Making, by Ivan Day at the web site of Historic Food:

Wafer cones are first mentioned in Bernard Claremont's The Professed Cook (London: 1769) and in Mary Smith's The Complete Housekeeper & Cook (Newcastle: 1770) . . . The earliest English record of this usage is in Charles Elmé Francatelli's The Modern Cook (London: 1846), in which he recommends cornets filled with ice cream as garnishes for a number of ice cream puddings.

1807 - In The Horizon Cookbook and Illustrated History of Eating and Drinking through the Ages, by William Harlan Hale and the Editors of Horizon Magazine shows a colored engraving, titled Frascati, that was published in 1807 with the caption:

The ladies caricatured in 1827, were members of the new fashionable set that gathered every day in Parisian cafes to gossip over ices and Mocha . . . Frascati's near the Opera was one of the most popular of dozens of cafes that sprang up in post-Revolutionary Paris. People gathered there to eat ice cream, sip liqueurs, gamble, and flirt . . .

Cafe Frascati was was originally opened in 1789. It was a restaurant and gambling house that was also famous for serving ice cream suppers. The restaurant had a reputation that any lady could be seen dining there without any scandal or stain on her character. Cake Frascati was closed down after a law against gambling appear in 1847.

Robert J. Weir and his wife Caroline Liddell, noted historians on the history of ice cream and the ice cream cone, were able to purchase the 1807 colored engraving, titled Frascati, in 2003. Check out Robert Weir's article An 1807 Ice Cream Cone: Discovery and Evidence to learn about his account of this engraving.

1820 - In the cookbook by William Alexis Jarrin called The Italian Confectioner, Jarrin describes himself on the title page as an "ornamental confectioner," attributes recent advances in the confectioner's art in England to two factors: "the aid of modern chemistry and the French Revolution, which led many leading chefs and confectioners to seek refuge and employment in England." Jarrin talks about the wafers used for ice cream. In his book he sometimes used the Italian version of William, Guglielmo, thus he is also referred to as G.A. Jarrin.

An article by Jeri Quinzio, The Ice Cream Cone Conundrum in the Radcliffe Culinary Times states:

But when did they start putting ice cream into these estravagant cones? G. A. Jarrin, an Italian confectioner working in London in the nineteenth century, wrote that his almond wafers should be rolled "on pieces of wood like hollow pillars, or give them any other form you may prefer. These wafters may be made of pistachios, covered with currants and powdered with coarse sifted sugar; they are used to garnish creams; when in season, a strawberry may be put into each end, but it must be a fine" . . . He suggested turning another of his wafers into "little horns; they are excellent to ornament a cream."

1888 - A cookbook called Mrs A. B. Marshall

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Don't worry kevin, I plan to do at least 15 - 20 pages of exegesis regarding the subject of Ice Cream! By the time I am finished you will know every single thing that there is to know about Ice Cream, I promise you!!!! :tum

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      John 5:39 Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they which testify of me.
      I am... Brother Ramsey
       
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      Praise God I found such a powerhouse of the outpouring of His Spirit and unapologetic in regards of the defense of the KJV Bible. When I became a Christian back in 1984, I was told to get & read the KJV. It's been my choice all these years.
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      Also, the land in Egypt wasn't land God gave them it was land Joseph through Pharaoh gave them. God gave them Canaan.
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