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Who May Baptize?


God's Child
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I am in a little heat at our local IFB Church because I allowed my Dad to baptize our daughter. He is called to preach, but not under IFB standards. I searched the Bible and didn't see a reason where I shouldn't allow my dad to do this. I don't see why others in a Church can't perform a baptism of a new believer. My dad Baptized our daughter at a local lake.

So, I wonder what others could add to this question, "Who May Baptize?"

“Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them…”

As a side note, it seems my daughter can't partake of communion at our Church since we followed through with this baptism. Is this normal IFB doctrine being followed?

Edited by God's Child
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  • Independent Fundamental Baptist

He is called to preach, but not under IFB standards.



It might would help if you could explain why he is not considered called to preach under IFB standards if possible. It would help the rest of us to know where the church is coming from.

In Christ,
PreacherE
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It might would help if you could explain why he is not considered called to preach under IFB standards if possible. It would help the rest of us to know where the church is coming from.

In Christ,
PreacherE


He is called to preach without the endorsement of an IFB Church and the training of an approved college. No IFB Church has laid hands on him and ordained him to spread the word. He has preached in Freewill Baptist Churches, but no IFB Church will allow him. Edited by God's Child
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I haven't seen any place in the Scriptures where one must be the "pastor" of the church to baptize; but I'm quite confident someone will be able to make a doctrine of it by Biblical example and the person's own genius at interpreting Scriptures.

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I think the main issue is that the purpose of baptism is to make a public profession of faith, and to establish accountability with the believers in one's local church. Baptism, as an ordinance of the church, should, IMO, be carried out in a church setting...not necessarily in a church building, but definitely in front of a congregation of believers. It isn't (again IMO) a private/family affair. It seems that an ordained minister should be the one to carry out the ceremony. My husband, who is an ordained preacher, will most likely be the one to baptize our kids, but it will be within the context of our local church, and with our pastor's blessing.

The command to "baptize all nations" was given to God's ordained ministers, the apostles. Given this biblical precedent, I don't think that "just anyone" can baptize...just like not everyone has the authority to perform marriage ceremonies.

I don't know about "normal" IFB doctrine, if there is any such thing. Some of the doctrines of my IFB church are different than others' churches on here. The "I" in IFB means "independent," after all...so each church is autonomous doctrinally.

Edited by Annie
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I think the main issue is that the purpose of baptism is to make a public profession of faith, and to establish accountability with the believers in one's local church. Baptism, as an ordinance of the church, should, IMO, be carried out in a church setting...not necessarily in a church building, but definitely in front of a congregation of believers. It isn't (again IMO) a private/family affair. It seems that an ordained minister should be the one to carry out the ceremony.

I don't know about "normal" IFB doctrine, if there is any such thing. Some of the doctrines of my IFB church are different than others' churches on here. The "I" in IFB means "independent," after all...so each church is autonomous doctrinally.


With modern technology private affairs can be made very public. We did this at a public place where others were able to watch. We took still pictures and sent emails out to friends both saved and unsaved sharing the gospel with them.

I don't understand scripturally how an ordained minister is needed to baptize. I just don't find it.

Plus, Philip baptized the Ethiopian eunuch without a Church watching. Edited by God's Child
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I haven't seen any place in the Scriptures where one must be the "pastor" of the church to baptize; but I'm quite confident someone will be able to make a doctrine of it by Biblical example and the person's own genius at interpreting Scriptures.



Hahaha... I agree. I don't see anywhere that you have to be a pastor or ordained to baptize. :clapping:

My only concern in this situation is WHY is he forbidden in IFB churches? Why is it that NO IFB church will ordain him? Does he have a bad testimony, or is his doctrine off in some major area?

Your church is forbidding communion? That sounds fishy, like maybe a Brider doctrine or something.

Baptist Briders get weird about baptism and their own personal form of Baptist Apostolic succession, which is a doctrine straight from the Mother Whore. Edited by Rick Schworer
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Hahaha... I agree. I don't see anywhere that you have to be a pastor or ordained to baptize. :clapping:

My only concern in this situation is WHY is he forbidden in IFB churches? Why is it that NO IFB church will ordain him? Does he have a bad testimony, or is his doctrine off in some major area?

Your church is forbidding communion? That sounds fishy, like maybe a Brider doctrine or something.

Baptist Briders get weird about baptism and their own personal form of Baptist Apostolic succession, which is a doctrine straight from the Mother Whore.


My dad has a good testimony, and he has actually gotten heat from some pastors for preaching too hard .... it's just that the local IFB Churches in these parts (the ones we have gotten to know) are very strict and won't share their pulpit with men outside the IFB circle. I am sure some IFB Churches would share it, since they are independent, we just don't know them yet.
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My dad has a good testimony, and he has actually gotten heat from some pastors for preaching too hard .... it's just that the local IFB Churches in these parts (the ones we have gotten to know) are very strict and won't share their pulpit with men outside the IFB circle. I am sure some IFB Churches would share it, since they are independent, we just don't know them yet.

Pastors in many IFB churches are very careful whom they have preach in their pulpits. Since Free Will churches teach that one can lose one's salvation, perhaps this is an indicator of why they won't have him preach. There may be other doctrinal differences as well.

Perhaps you should ask your pastor why he disapproves of your dad baptizing your daughter - and how this issue would be reason, in his mind, to keep her from taking communion (I'm puzzled as to why it would be forbidden by the pastor: we are IFB, and children taking communion or not is left up to the parents, which is actually biblical...).
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I think the main issue is that the purpose of baptism is to make a public profession of faith, and to establish accountability with the believers in one's local church. Baptism, as an ordinance of the church, should, IMO, be carried out in a church setting...not necessarily in a church building, but definitely in front of a congregation of believers. It isn't (again IMO) a private/family affair. It seems that an ordained minister should be the one to carry out the ceremony. My husband, who is an ordained preacher, will most likely be the one to baptize our kids, but it will be within the context of our local church, and with our pastor's blessing.

The command to "baptize all nations" was given to God's ordained ministers, the apostles. Given this biblical precedent, I don't think that "just anyone" can baptize...just like not everyone has the authority to perform marriage ceremonies.

I don't know about "normal" IFB doctrine, if there is any such thing. Some of the doctrines of my IFB church are different than others' churches on here. The "I" in IFB means "independent," after all...so each church is autonomous doctrinally.


Since the Great Commission (Matthew 28:19) includes baptizing and you say this was given to God's ordained ministers, the apostles, then wouldn't that mean the entire Great Commission was given to such rather than to every believer?

Are all believers called to "Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, batpizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost:" or is this only for those specifically called to the ministry; such as apostles, pastors, missionaries, etc.?
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The authority to baptize was given to the local church by Jesus Christ Himself in Matthew 28. The command to teach and then baptize was not given specifically to each individual person Christ was addressing. If that were the case, the baptism would die out like the apostolic gifts did. The authority to baptize was given to the group of Christians, i.e., the church, because the church would live on.

Thus, baptism is an ordinance of the local church. Because the local church has the authority, it can "authorize" anyone within it to conduct baptisms. Most often, local churches delegate that responsibility to pastors and deacons.

So, in answer to the opening post, if the church has not authorized the grandfather to baptize (assuming your daughter is saved), then your daughter's baptism is invalid. And that's prOBably why the church is not allowing your daughter to partake of the Lord's Supper - she has not been scripturally baptized.

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Can you provide the biblical evidence for this statement?

Simply the fact that the father is the head of the home (and command is given to OBey parents)...I don't see anywhere in scripture where anyone in a church supersedes parental authority.

Don't get me wrong - I believe that the pastor needs to teach what communion is and how it is to be taken...but the decision as to whether the child takes it or not (how soon after salvation, etc.) should be left up to the parents.
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Simply the fact that the father is the head of the home (and command is given to OBey parents)...I don't see anywhere in scripture where anyone in a church supersedes parental authority.


Wouldn't this touch upon the issue as to who is responsible for making sure one rightly partakes of the Lord's Supper; the individual or the pastor? In some churches the Lord's Supper is open to any who profess Christ as Saviour and Lord, yet others require pastoral approval before one can partake of the Lord's Supper.
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Wouldn't this touch upon the issue as to who is responsible for making sure one rightly partakes of the Lord's Supper; the individual or the pastor? In some churches the Lord's Supper is open to any who profess Christ as Saviour and Lord, yet others require pastoral approval before one can partake of the Lord's Supper.

Well, how communion is handled would certainly be up to the individual churches - but I've never heard of an IFB church where pastoral approval is required to partake.
But, again, ultimately the father is responsible for making sure his child(ren) rightly do anything...(when they are under his roof, I mean)
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Well, how communion is handled would certainly be up to the individual churches - but I've never heard of an IFB church where pastoral approval is required to partake.
But, again, ultimately the father is responsible for making sure his child(ren) rightly do anything...(when they are under his roof, I mean)


By pastoral approval, I mean the practice of the pastor having to approve of ones baptism or have performed ones baptism himself before he allows them to partake of the Lord's Supper.

Some pastors believe it's the individuals responsibility to ensure they are truly born again, rightly baptized and walking right with God while other pastors believe the responsibility is upon them to be sure of such before one partakes of the Lord's Supper in their church. This would necessarily include children as well as adults.
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By pastoral approval, I mean the practice of the pastor having to approve of ones baptism or have performed ones baptism himself before he allows them to partake of the Lord's Supper.

Some pastors believe it's the individuals responsibility to ensure they are truly born again, rightly baptized and walking right with God while other pastors believe the responsibility is upon them to be sure of such before one partakes of the Lord's Supper in their church. This would necessarily include children as well as adults.

The sticking point is still the "he allows," John. When a child is saved, baptized and becomes a member of said church, that child can biblically partake of communion. But it is up to the parents WHEN that child begins the practice. Some parents don't believe that their children should take communion at, say, 5 years old, because they might feel the child doesn't understand what the time of communion really is. That is their biblical responsibility and right - but it isn't the pastor's. SWIM?

That is why I encouraged God'sChild to go to his pastor. Their church covnstitution should cover things like baptism and communion.
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When a child is saved, baptized and becomes a member of said church, that child can biblically partake of communion. But it is up to the parents WHEN that child begins the practice.

Not that it really matters, but I agree with you on this. My interpretation of your earlier statement was that any child can participate in the Lord's Supper, as long as the parent OK'd it.

OK, I think we've sufficiently hijacked this thread. Let's try to get it back to the original question. Okey-dokey? :11backtotopic:
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Not that it really matters, but I agree with you on this. My interpretation of your earlier statement was that any child can participate in the Lord's Supper, as long as the parent OK'd it.

OK, I think we've sufficiently hijacked this thread. Let's try to get it back to the original question. Okey-dokey? :11backtotopic:


Exactly what Mitch said! :icon_mrgreen:
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I would like to add a few comments from a pastor's perspective:

#1 - The entire great commission is both an individual and church responsibility.

As an individual we have the God-given responsibility to give out the gospel and to disciple those who get saved. Baptism is the very first step of OBedience for a child of God and because of this no discipleship can happen until the newly saved believer is baptized. The local church is Biblically responsible for the oversight of the great commission and is the only institution that has Christ's authority to baptize people. In the case of Philip, he was a deacon in the church at Jerusalem sent out to proclaim the gospel (in other words, he was a preacher). He baptized under the authority of that church.

#2 - A local church (under the pastor's direction) can authorize anyone to do the baptizing. By Biblical example this individual should be a God-called preacher.

#3 - If someone is baptize outside of the authority of a local church then that particular local church has every right not to recognize the baptism as being scriptural.

#4 - In our Baptist churches, baptism is generally linked to church membership. This means that if the baptism is not considered to be scriptural then the person will not be permitted to be a member of that church.

#5 - Since most Baptist churches restrict communion to those who are members of their particular Baptist church then it is OBvious why the girl is not allowed to partake of communion since she is more than likely not considered to be a member.

Sincerely,
Bro Steve Smith

Edited by brosmith
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