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  1. Today
  2. RSS Robot

    Prepared Hearts

    “For Ezra had prepared his heart to seek the law of the LORD, and to do it, and to teach in Israel statutes and judgments.” (Ezra 7:10) It does not come naturally into our hearts to seek, obey, and then teach others the words of God as found in the Scriptures. Therefore, like Ezra, we must prepare our hearts. The Hebrew word for “prepare” m... More...View the full article
  3. HappyChristian

    Whats for Supper...

    Last night we had our first men's dinner, basically a Father's Day celebration. Of nine men members, 8 came, and 6 visitors. They had a good time, enjoyed the food, the fellowship, and the message. Pulled pork barbecue sandwiches, cole slaw, pasta salad, baked beans, stuffed eggs; apple pie, blackberry cobbler, and ice cream for dessert. I had a sausage muffin.
  4. Yesterday
  5. RSS Robot

    The Unequal Yoke

    “Be ye not unequally yoked together with unbelievers: for what fellowship hath righteousness with unrighteousness? and what communion hath light with darkness?” (2 Corinthians 6:14) This is one of the definitive statements in Scripture on the doctrine of Christian separation. Not only should believers refrain from practicing evil teaching and error, they shou... More...View the full article
  6. Last week
  7. EINSTEIN’S THEORY OF HAPPINESS SELLS FOR $1.6 MILLION (Friday Church News Notes, June 22, 2018, www.wayoflife.org, fbns@wayoflife.org, 866-295-4143) - Albert Einstein’s theory of happiness sold recently at an auction for $1.6 million. He wrote the “theory” on a piece of paper in 1922 and gave it to a hotel bellboy. It read, “A calm and modest life brings more happiness than the pursuit of success combined with constant restlessness.” This, of course, is a simple platitude that most people would recognize as basically true, yet it is also vague and therefore nearly meaningless. Einstein was... Read More View the full article
  8. RSS Robot

    In a Moment

    “Behold, I shew you a mystery; We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump: for the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed.” (1 Corinthians 15:51-52) This is one of the greatest promises in the Bible, assuring us that “we”... More...View the full article
  9. RSS Robot

    He That Is Spiritual

    “But he that is spiritual judgeth all things, yet he himself is judged of no man.” (1 Corinthians 2:15) The word rendered “spiritual” is the Greek word pneumatikos, from which theologians have coined the term “pneumatology,” the doctrine of the Holy Spirit. Thus, a “spiritual” person is one who is not only born aga... More...View the full article
  10. Roselove

    Saved in 3 tenses?

    There’s one more thing that’s been really nagging at me, that I heard. The seal of the Holy Spirit is a down payment, but when you get a down payment you can give it back or if you trash the house that someone gave their down payment for, they then legally aren’t obligated to purchase the house and can then get their down payment, back. Brings to mind when the Bible says to respect the our body because the Holy Spirit lives in us. Also, that we’re only engaged to Christ, not married yet. So we must be ready for when He comes back, so when Jesus comes, we are found spotless and as a chaste virgin. These definitely got me a bit concerned.
  11. Alan

    Patriotism

    President Donald Trump, Patriot Thank you President Trump and your love for America, the Constitution of the United States, and the values that we hold dear as Americans. Alan
  12. Pastor Scott Markle

    Saved in 3 tenses?

    Sister Rose, I certainly agree that we should read and study God's Word in a straight forward manner. However, a straight forward reading of this parable about the two olive trees in Romans 11:16-24 leaves us with one very significant question unanswered. That question is this -- What does the root/trunk of the good olive tree represent? The passage seems to define what the branches of the good olive tree represent., and it seems to define what the branches of the wild olive tree represent. On the other hand, while the passage references the root/trunk of the good olive tree four times (and by referencing the tree itself, infers the root/trunk a few additional times), the passage itself does NOT seem to define specifically what the root/trunk of the good olive might be. Yet defining this representation is QUITE significant for your question. Certainly, the parable and passage DOES communicate that there is something which might be possessed, but which then might also be lost. Whatever this something is, it is represented by the root/trunk of the good olive tree. It is the root/trunk of the good olive tree that the Israelites possess by nature. It is the root/trunk of the good olive tree from which the Israelites were cut off because of their unbelief (thus a possession lost). It is the root/trunk of the good olive tree into which we Gentiles might be grafted through faith. It is the root/trunk of the good olive tree about which the warning is given that we Gentiles might also be cut off after being grafted in (thus the possibility of a possession lost). It is the root/trunk of the good olive tree into which the Israelites who were cut off might be grafted back in. Even so, by a straight forward reading of the parable and passage, the "something" that might be either possessed or lost IS the root/trunk of the good olive tree. So then, we must ask -- What does the root/trunk of the good olive tree represent? Yet as we read through the passage, it does NOT define this representation for us, which "complicates" our understanding of the passage and parable. Now above you said -- Most certainly, you should read God's Word in a literary manner, like you would any other book. However, when a given passage itself does not provide the specific information to answer a specific question that we have, further and deeper interpreting is required. What does the parable and passage reveal straightforwardly -- 1. The root/trunk of the tree (whatever it represents) is holy by character, and thus so are the branches that it contains. (Romans 11:16) 2. Some of the natural branches (Israelites, as per the immediate context) of the good olive tree were broken off from the root/trunk of the good olive tree. (Romans 11:17) 3. We Gentiles were grafted into the root/trunk of the good olive tree, and thus partake of the "root and fatness" of that tree along with the natural branches. (Romans 11:17) 4. Because of this, we Gentiles should not boast against the natural branches (Israelites) because we do not bear the root/trunk of the tree, but it bears us. (Romans 11:18) 5. The natural branches (Israelites) of the good olive tree were broken off because of unbelief. (Romans 11:20) 6. We Gentiles were grafted into the root/trunk of the good olive tree through faith. (Romans 11:20) 7. We Gentiles should take warning that if God did not spare the natural branches (Israelites) of the good olive tree, then he might also not spare us Gentiles. (Romans 11:21) 8. This all reveals the "goodness and severity of God," on the Israelites His severity, on us Gentiles His goodness -- if we Gentiles continue in His goodness. (Romans 11:22) 9. However, if we Gentiles do not continue in God's goodness toward us, then we also might be cut off from the root/trunk of the good olive tree. (Romans 11:22) 10. The natural branches (Israelites) who were cut off from the root/trunk of the good olive tree might be grafted back in if they remain not in unbelief, but come to faith. (Romans 11:23) 11. Indeed, if us Gentiles as the branches of a wild olive tree could be "grafted contrary to nature" into the root/trunk of the good olive tree, then "how much more" might "the natural branches" of that good olive tree be grafted back into "their own olive tree?" Now, throughout this entire matter the root/trunk of the good olive tree plays a significant part. What then does the root/trunk of the good olive tree represent? While the passage does provide us with elements of information about the root/trunk of the good olive tree, it never actually specifies what the root/trunk of the good olive tree represents. Thus ANY answer that we develop for our understanding of the parable and passage requires some level of conjecture or assumption. For example, I believe that within your own struggle in relation to the passage, you have made an assumption concerning the representation for the root/trunk of the good olive tree, as follows -- That portion in your above statement which I have emphasized appears to reveal your (assumed) understanding concerning that which the root/trunk of the good olive tree represents. The parable and passage speaks about branches being cut off from the root/trunk (and fatness) of the good olive tree. Above you speak about being "cut off" from God's saving grace. Thus you appear to be equating God's saving grace with the root/trunk of the good olive tree. I myself do not agree with this understanding for the representation of the root/trunk of the good olive tree for the following conjectured (deeper) reasonings -- 1. Whatever the root/trunk of the good olive tree might be, it is the possession of the Israelites naturally, such that they all were attached to it at the first (before they were cut off from it through unbelief). Yet to me it does not appear Biblically correct to say that God's saving grace is NATURALLY possessed by the all Israelites, but that they might be cut off from that saving grace through unbelief. Now, I might be able to accept the argument, not that the root/trunk of the good olive tree represents God's saving grace itself, but that it represents the OPPORTUNITY to receive to God's saving grace. Then the passage would be indicating that the OPPORTUNITY and PRIVELEGE to receive God's saving grace (not the saving grace itself) is the possession of His chosen people NATURALLY, but that they spiritually fell from that greater OPPORTUNITY and PRIVELEGE to receive God's saving grace through their unbelief as a people, such that as a people they are now bound under a heavy cloud of spiritual blindness. Even so, then the passage would also be indicating concerning the grafting in of us Gentiles, not that we now possess God's saving grace itself, but that we now possess a more ready OPPORTUNITY and PRIVELEGE to receive God's saving grace. This more ready OPPORTUNITY and PRIVELEGE to receive God's saving grace would be God's goodness toward us Gentiles as a people. Yet that goodness only continues toward us as a people if we continue in it. However, if we Gentiles persist in unbelief against God's saving grace, that more ready OPPORTUNITY and PRIVELEGE to receive God's saving grace could be cut off from us also, such that we Gentiles also as a people (or some particular societal structure among us Gentiles) might be bound under the heavy cloud of spiritual blindness as the Israelites. 2. As per the immediate context in Romans 11:5-6, God's saving grace comes specifically through His GRACE, such that it includes NO requirement of works whatsoever at all. Yet if we claim (from Romans 11:20-22) that God's saving grace is indeed received initially through faith, but that we must continue in His goodness in order to remain therein without losing it, then we have added some level of "working faithfulness" to the means of God's saving grace. Then we have -- God's saving grace is received through faith and retained through (working) faithfulness. Yet Romans 11:6 clearly indicates that if it be at all of works, "then is it no more grace." Now we have a contradiction within the immediate context of Romans 11. Yet no such contradiction in God's Word can possibly be, especially within the same immediate context. An apparent contradiction only reveals that we are in some manner not understanding something correctly. 3. The primary principle for the parable of the two olive trees is NOT about the matter of eternal security (security established by God's promise) versus faithfulness security (security retained through our faithfulness). Rather, the primary principle for the parable is a warning that we Gentiles (especially Gentile believers) should not develop a wrong attitude against unbelieving Israelites. We should not become boastful against them. We should not become high-minded against them. We should not become wise in our own conceits against them. Rather, we should ever walk in the fear of the Lord our God, and should ever retain a spirit of gracious humility in relation to the Israelites as the NATURAL branches of the good olive tree, into which God graciously grafted us within His goodness against our nature. 4. Romans 11:28-32 provides the conclusion to the matter. Therefore, its references to the gospel, the gifts and calling of God, and the mercy of God must all fit with unity in relation to our understanding of the parable in Romans 11:16-24. 5. At least one other interpretive question requires consideration. Throughout the parable of Romans 11:16-24, plural pronouns are employed for Israelite "branches" that were cut off from the good olive tree, whereas singular pronouns are employed for the Gentile representation in the parable. So then, do these singular pronouns for the Gentile representation encompass the whole of Gentiles as a singular group; or do these singular pronouns for the Gentile representation reference just a single Gentile individual (possibly, a single Gentile believer). It also worthy of notice that throughout the rest of the chapter's context, the Gentiles are considered from the plural perspective, just as the Israelites. Now, above you ask the question -- Truly, the answer to your question is founded directly upon a correct understanding for what the root/trunk of the good olive tree represents. In my previous postings, I have contended that the root/trunk of the good olive tree represents the covenants of promise that the Lord God originally gave unto the Israelites.
  13. According to emerging church theology, the object of the church’s mission on earth is not the preaching of gospel but the building of the kingdom of God. It is earth-minded and mocks a heavenly-minded orientation. It gets more excited about solving the “AIDS crisis” and saving the polar bears than winning lost souls. Emerging church writings say very little about the salvation of the soul, but they say a lot about the salvation of society and creation. Their activism runs toward all sorts of very liberal social-justice concerns--environmentalism, animal rights, you name it--anything except the winning of souls. If there is any emphasis at all upon the winning of souls, it is a secondary thing. They use terms such as “missional” and “holistic” to define this agenda. The Emergent Village says: “We see the earth and all it contains as God’s beloved creation, and so we join God in seeking its good, its healing, and its blessing”... Read More View the full article
  14. RSS Robot

    Things We Ought to Do

    “Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye pay tithe of mint and anise and cummin, and have omitted the weightier matters of the law, judgment, mercy, and faith: these ought ye to have done, and not to leave the other undone.” (Matthew 23:23) This sharp rebuke by Jesus to the legalists of His day should also be taken seriously by us today. Although ... More...View the full article
  15. Roselove

    Saved in 3 tenses?

    I’m going to have to think over this, it’s pretty complex. I’m trying to wrap my head around how this is talking about all of these things at once. So, in verse 22 this specifically talking about the blessings at believers, depending on our walk with Him? I guess the biggest thing that confuses me is how this portion of Scripture is worded. I feel like if you read it in a simple way, it’d seem pretty straight-forward that if we don’t continue with God, we won’t be in His saving grace, anymore. It seems like a lot of things that appear to say that, if you take it as face value, it seems to go along with that belief. But, if one believes in security, then we have to look at it in a more complex way. I realize that there are many complex things in the Bible, being that it’s the Word of the Amazing God. I guess I just have a hard time not reading the Bible like I would any other book. Usually you wouldn’t have to do a lot of deep interperating to figure out what a chapter out of it was trying to say. This is my main struggle, I think.
  16. heartstrings

    How to sharpen an axe

    Long ago I found that axes sharpen better and can be "tempered" with water close at hand Ephesians 5:26
  17. Some independent Baptists and fundamentalists in general seem to be reacting to the worldliness of many churches by adopting a “plain clothes” style that is akin to the old Mennonite fashion. I can understand the rejection of worldliness, but I question the plain clothes position and fear for its end result. We should not establish doctrine and practice on the basis of “reactionism,” but upon solid Bible teaching. I know of dozens of families and churches in five states that are moving in this direction. The Charity Fellowship... Read More View the full article
  18. RSS Robot

    What to Put On

    “And, behold, I send the promise of my Father upon you: but tarry ye in the city of Jerusalem, until ye be endued with power from on high.” (Luke 24:49) People give much attention to what material clothes they should put on, but the New Testament tells us what spiritual clothes to put on. First, we are to be “endued with” power from on high. This Greek w... More...View the full article
  19. corinne gomez

    SOS

    In Jesus Christ, of course!
  20. Invicta

    Whats for Supper...

    Today I did Sea Bass fillet on a bed of julienne vegetables with watercress salad and sautée pototaes.
  21. Roselove

    Saved in 3 tenses?

    I’m going to have to think over this, it’s pretty complex. I’m trying to wrap my head around how this is talking about all of these things at once.
  22. Pastor Scott Markle

    Saved in 3 tenses?

    Sister Rose, In answer to your question above, Yes and No. If the root of the good olive tree does indeed represent the covenants of promise, then inclusion therein is about opportunity and privilege. Let us consider a few different scenarios in relation to this matter. First, let us consider those Israelites who were the first generation in the Lord’s redemption from the bondage of Egypt. Indeed, they all experienced that divine redemption through their faith in the blood of the Passover lamb, as they all sprinkled its blood upon the door post and lintel. There is no indication that the death angel entered into any Israelite home that night. Even so, in 1 Corinthians 10:1-4 God’s Word gives the report concerning that very generation of Israelites, “Moreover, brethren, I would not that ye should be ignorant, how that all our fathers were under the cloud, and all passed through the sea; and were all baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea; and did all eat the same spiritual meat; and did all drink the same spiritual drink: for they drank of that spiritual Rock that followed them: and that Rock was Christ.” They were all believers in God’s redemption through the blood of the lamb. They were all under the cloud of God’s glorious presence. They were all baptized unto Moses through the crossing of the Red Sea. They all partook of the same spiritual meat and drink, such that they all partook of Christ Himself. As such, the Lord God entered into the covenants of promise with all of them at Mount Sinai; and those covenants of promise included the “fatness” of the Promised Land. However, because of their unbelief and disobedience at Kadesh, they were not permitted to enter into the Promised Land and to experience its “fatness.” Rather, they were required to wander in the wilderness until that generation passed away. Thus in 1 Corinthians 10:5-6 God’s Word gives further report, “But with many of them God was not well pleased: for they were overthrown in the wilderness. Now these things were our examples, to the intent we should not lust after evil things, as they also lusted.” Yet even throughout their wandering in the wilderness, they still had the Lord’s presence with them, the Lord’s provision for them, and the Lord’s protection over them. Did they have part in the covenants of promise as their root possession? Did they enjoy the fullness of those promises? No, they did not, because of their unbelief and disobedience. (See Hebrews 3:7-11) Yet did they experience some aspects of those promises? Yes, they did, even throughout their wanderings in the wilderness. However, the scribes and Pharisees in the time of the Lord Jesus Christ’s earthly ministry present a different case. Although they were very religious, having “a zeal of God, but not according to knowledge.” (See Romans 10:2) “For they being ignorant of God’s righteousness, and going about to establish their own righteousness,” through their religious works of the law, did not “submitted themselves unto the righteousness of God.” (See Romans 10:3) Although they were very religious, they were never believers. Thus our Lord Jesus Christ pronounced that they were not spiritually the children of God, but that they were of their spiritual father, the devil. (See John 8:42-44) So then, did they have part in the covenants of promise as their root possession? Yes, as Israelites they did indeed. On the other hand, did they experience and enjoy the fullness of those promises? No, actually because of their rejection of the Lord Jesus Christ, they spiritually fell and were cut off from their covenants of promise as a people (although not completely or permanently). In fact, the Lord God has now judged them as a people with spiritual blindness “in part.” (See Romans 11:7-11, 25) This is the “severity of God” toward the Israelites unto which Romans 11:22 makes reference. Now, the spiritual fall and cutting off of the Israelites as a people has opened a spiritual door for us Gentiles as a people. Whereas the spiritual opportunities of the Israelites as a people have become quite restricted through the spiritual blindness that the Lord God has place upon them, the spiritual opportunities of the Gentiles has become significantly more readily available. Now, while the access of the Israelites as people unto their covenants of promise has been significantly restricted, the access of us Gentiles as a people unto those covenants of promise has been offered more freely. Indeed, we of the wild olive tree have an open opportunity to be grafted into the Israelites’ natural root possession, their covenants of promise. Yet our part in those covenants of promise does not include the “fatness” of the Promised Land. Rather, our part in those covenants of promise includes the “fatness” of a promised spiritual LIFE, even as our Lord Jesus Christ revealed in John 10:10, “I am come that they might have LIFE, and that they might have it more ABUNDANTLY.” Even so, this time of the New Testament church is that time wherein every believer receives the indwelling of God the Holy Spirit from the very moment of faith in Christ for salvation, such that the indwelling Holy Spirit might enable our abundant spiritual living as we submit unto His filling influence and direction. This is the “goodness” of God toward the Gentiles unto which Romans 11:22 makes reference. So then, what about us Gentiles who might not believe in the Lord Jesus Christ? By the record of the New Testament, it seems apparent that a great majority of the Gentiles as a people will indeed reject the Lord Jesus Christ as Savior. Even so, because of their unbelief and rejection they also may be cut off from access unto the covenants of promise. In fact, after some point of rejection and rebellion against the gospel, the Lord God may cut off any given Gentile from an opportunity to come unto Christ through faith for salvation. This is one aspect of the “severity of God” toward the Gentiles about which Romans 11:22 warns. On the other hand, by the record of the New Testament, it also seems apparent that many of us Gentiles will indeed receive the Lord Jesus Christ through faith as eternal Savior. As such, we receive full access unto the “fatness” of the promised life that is found within the new covenant of promise. Yet our experience of that “fatness” is still determined by our faithfulness unto the Lord and by our submission unto the filling influence of the indwelling Holy Spirit throughout our daily walk. If we do not walk in faithfulness and the filling of the Holy Spirit, we will not be cut off from our place in eternal life, but we will be cut off from the “fatness” of the abundant life. This also is an aspect of the “severity of God” toward the Gentiles, although less severe, about which Romans 11:22 warns.
  23. RSS Robot

    Coming Like the Flood

    “So shall they fear the name of the LORD from the west, and his glory from the rising of the sun. When the enemy shall come in like a flood, the Spirit of the LORD shall lift up a standard against him.” (Isaiah 59:19) The great enemy of our souls “the devil, as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour” (View the full article
  24. HappyChristian

    Whats for Supper...

    We went to lunch with our son today - he wanted to treat Randy for Father's Day. We went to a restaurant that we've wanted to try. Hubs had chicken parmesan. My mom had a ground prime rib burger. Josh and I had the fish and chips. It was the best fish I've had in a long time. The fries weren't so great, but I'd go back for the fish again (hubs and son loved the fries).
  25. Roselove

    Saved in 3 tenses?

    Not offended, at all! I think your attention to detail is very helpful! It has helped me piece together things that I don’t know if I could have come to, on my own. I certainly appreciate the time you spend on your studies, they have taught me a lot, so far! It’d be nice if my obsessive mind processed things, like yours. You seem to handle it in a way healthier way, than myself. Mental illness runs in my family pretty bad. I think I mention this stuff, because my heart is crying for help. I feel so alone at times, the only other person that I really knew personally that struggled like me, was my dad.
  26. Jim_Alaska

    Saved in 3 tenses?

    I know, that's your excuse and your a stickin to it. But no matter what the reason, I am thankful for it.
  27. Andrea

    Pray for our church please

    Thank you, Jim. Here is the link to our church website: https://www.hopebaptistcolorado.org
  28. Pastor Scott Markle

    Saved in 3 tenses?

    Sister Rose, I desire that my following comment will be taken somewhat seriously, but with a little bit of humor as well; yet I most definitely do not wish to cause any offense. Now the comment - While I am not clinically diagnosed with OCD, I am an individual who Obsessively Cares about Details, especially in Bible study. Such is the reason for my lengthy, detailed, thorough, extensive answers to questions. I simply pray that it is all good to the use of edifying and that it ministers God's grace unto others.
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