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The lost are watching you. This post is not to condemn but, edify. There may be some I use loosely so please point it out to me.

Exodus 20:7 Thou shalt not take the name of the LORD thy God in vain; for the LORD will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain.

World's definition of good grief:
An exclamation expressing surprise, alarm, dismay, or some other, usually negative emotion. For example, Good grief! You're not going to start all over again, or Good grief! He's dropped the cake. The term is a euphemism for "good God."

What is vain usage of God's name?

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Expressing surprise or alarm is not using God's name in vain.


That is true, expressing surprise or alarm is not vain use of God's name. But, a euphemism that even the worldly knows is pointed toward the Holy God we all worship is disrespectful of God and His Holy name.

Why don't we study the Holiness of God along with the Holiness of His name?

I'll start...

Ezekiel 36:22 Therefore say unto the house of Israel, Thus saith the Lord GOD; I do not this for your sakes, O house of Israel, but for mine holy name's sake, which ye have profaned among the heathen, whither ye went.
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Which post you have a problem with?


No post is a problem. I wondered if some might like to comment on euphemisms referencing God and other repetitive uses of God's name. Also, I thought it might be important in our view of God's holiness.

What do you think, does God care?
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I have never head the term "good grief" is a euphemism for "good God".

All I know about ther term "good grief" is that Charlie Brown said that a lot.


Now that you know what do you think about using it to express astonishment?
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Now that you know what do you think about using it to express astonishment?


Well, actually I still don't "know" that expression is a euphemism.

That said, a person can say various things but not mean what another might think it means and God knows our hearts.

In England when a person uses the word fag he is most likely not referring to what an American would be referring to and yet that expression is a euphemism as are many others with multiple meanings.
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We don't know that "good grief" is a euphemism for "good God," but we do know that you said it is.......

I'm not certain that it is good policy to base what one believes and practices based upon something that one person in cyberspace has declared to be so.

But this is a subject I've wanted to discuss for a long time and look forward to this verbal discourse.

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We don't know that "good grief" is a euphemism for "good God," but we do know that you said it is.......

I'm not certain that it is good policy to base what one believes and practices based upon something that one person in cyberspace has declared to be so.

But this is a subject I've wanted to discuss for a long time and look forward to this verbal discourse.


I thought about answering another way but, the Lord rebuked me. I left off the reference on the original post, oops! How about I just cite references for good grief, my original first then others:

For example, Good grief! You're not going to start all over again, or Good grief ! He's dropped the cake. The term is a euphemism for "good God. ...
dictionary.reference.com/browse/good+grief

?Good grief!? exclam. used to indicate surprise and disbelief (may be used as a euphemistic replacement for ?Good God!? which is considered, by some, ...
www.idiomcenter.com/forum/threads/1662

Euphemisms-Watching How We Speak
What is a euphemism? The idea comes from a Greek word, euphemismos, which fundamentally means "good .... Good grief (Good God). Zounds (by God?s wounds) ...
www.knollwoodchurch.org/yr2002/l02_euphemisms.html

A Dictionary of Catch Phrases: British and American, from the ... - Google Books Resultby Eric Partridge, Paul Beale - 1986 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 384 pages
[good grief! This has been proposed by an eminent scholar; but all such mere euphemisms for good God! are ineligible. On the other hand, good grief, ...
books.google.com/books?isbn=041505916X...

So, now that we can trust me...it's a good topic to discuss among other IFBs and people of like faith.
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Well, when I first heard that euphemisms such as these were wrong a couple of years ago I must say it annoyed me. I said things like that all the time without a second thought. I didn't consider there to be anything wrong with it at all and I felt objecting to it was straining at a gnat and just looking for an offense. However, with time, I have come to understand that that at best they are meaningless statements that offend some brothers in Christ(no reason to offend without good cause) and at worst they are euphemistic swearing. Now I try not to use them anymore but I still do so ocassionally out of long habit.

"Matthew 5:34-37 But I say unto you, Swear not at all; neither by heaven; for it is God's throne: Nor by the earth; for it is his footstool: neither by Jerusalem; for it is the city of the great King. Neither shalt thou swear by thy head, because thou canst not make one hair white or black. But let your communication be, Yea, yea; Nay, nay: for whatsoever is more than these cometh of evil."

"James 5:12 But above all things, my brethren, swear not, neither by heaven, neither by the earth, neither by any other oath: but let your yea be yea; and your nay, nay; lest ye fall into condemnation."

"Romans 14:21 It is good neither to eat flesh, nor to drink wine, nor any thing whereby thy brother stumbleth, or is offended, or is made weak."

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Well, when I first heard that euphemisms such as these were wrong a couple of years ago I must say it annoyed me. I said things like that all the time without a second thought. I didn't consider there to be anything wrong with it at all and I felt objecting to it was straining at a gnat and just looking for an offense. However, with time, I have come to understand that that at best they are meaningless statements that offend some brothers in Christ(no reason to offend without good cause) and at worst they are euphemistic swearing. Now I try not to use them anymore but I still do so ocassionally out of long habit.

"Matthew 5:34-37 But I say unto you, Swear not at all; neither by heaven; for it is God's throne: Nor by the earth; for it is his footstool: neither by Jerusalem; for it is the city of the great King. Neither shalt thou swear by thy head, because thou canst not make one hair white or black. But let your communication be, Yea, yea; Nay, nay: for whatsoever is more than these cometh of evil."

"James 5:12 But above all things, my brethren, swear not, neither by heaven, neither by the earth, neither by any other oath: but let your yea be yea; and your nay, nay; lest ye fall into condemnation."

"Romans 14:21 It is good neither to eat flesh, nor to drink wine, nor any thing whereby thy brother stumbleth, or is offended, or is made weak."



Several years ago Dr. Homer Massey explained euphamisms to me. I don't use them and as I type I consider what I say. The tenents I "personally" adhere to are: (1) A lost world continues to use these and much worse with reference to God; let our communication show a difference. (2) I agree with your scripture references about preventing any stumbling. New christians should not be yoked but taught. (3) God is holy, God's name is holy, let's not be lawful, proud, or boastful; let our communication show our reverence to our holy God.

Philemon 1:6 That the communication of thy faith may become effectual by the acknowledging of every good thing which is in you in Christ Jesus.

1 Corinthians 15:33 Be not deceived: evil communications corrupt good manners.

If I offend, forgive me, this is meant to edify.

Philippians 4:8 Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.
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I for one had never heard of the origin of "good grief" until I read this thread. I have, however, heard that "oh, my goodness," "oh my gracious," "goodness gracious," "egad," "gadzooks," "land sakes," and many other common expressions of surprise are all blasphemous euphemisms, or at least had blasphemous origins. Vulgar expressions with questionable origins include "kissing up," "bang for your buck," "brown nosing," "great day," etc., etc., etc. (The list really does go on and on.)

I have taught my kids that we do not use "careless speech," or "slang." I don't care so much about the actual origin of a phrase or idiom...because, really, who knew that "good grief" originated in the way it did? (Obviously, "oh my gosh" bears more resemblance to its origin, so I would definitely tell my kids that they may not EVER use this phrase in my house. I wouldn't come out so strongly against "good grief.") I imagine that if I were to ask anyone on the street, Christian or nonchristian, how that phrase originated, they'd have no clue. It has lost that meaning, if indeed it ever had that meaning in general public usage. So, really, my testimony before the world would not be damaged at all if I were to use this expression. (Same with "oh, my goodness," etc.) To me, the issue is not testimony, but what is "best." Another issue is that of knowledge: it is only those people with limited vocabularies who resort to continual slang and vulgarity...They've simply never been taught how to express themselves in a clearer, better way. They lace their speech with the same, old, tired words and idioms; it's sad, really. My desire for believers is that they would learn how to express themselves precisely and creatively enough not to have to rely on these common (vulgar) expressions.

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Here is a good article regarding Christian Cursing:

http://biblebelievers.com/jmelton/ChristianCursing.html


Dr. Massey would be pleased. I had never seen this before but it brings to mind even more scripture.

I just searched on "his name," and there were only 166 verses. Not all may refer to God.

The search on communication gave up a nugget!

2 Kings 9:11 Then Jehu came forth to the servants of his lord: and one said unto him, Is all well? wherefore came this mad fellow to thee? And he said unto them, Ye know the man, and his communication.

What a testimony!"...Ye know the man, and his communication."
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I for one had never heard of the origin of "good grief" until I read this thread. I have, however, heard that "oh, my goodness," "oh my gracious," "goodness gracious," "egad," "gadzooks," "land sakes," and many other common expressions of surprise are all blasphemous euphemisms, or at least had blasphemous origins. Vulgar expressions with questionable origins include "kissing up," "bang for your buck," "brown nosing," "great day," etc., etc., etc. (The list really does go on and on.)

I have taught my kids that we do not use "careless speech," or "slang." I don't care so much about the actual origin of a phrase or idiom...because, really, who knew that "good grief" originated in the way it did? (Obviously, "oh my gosh" bears more resemblance to its origin, so I would definitely tell my kids that they may not EVER use this phrase in my house. I wouldn't come out so strongly against "good grief.") I imagine that if I were to ask anyone on the street, Christian or nonchristian, how that phrase originated, they'd have no clue. It has lost that meaning, if indeed it ever had that meaning in general public usage. So, really, my testimony before the world would not be damaged at all if I were to use this expression. (Same with "oh, my goodness," etc.) To me, the issue is not testimony, but what is "best." Another issue is that of knowledge: it is only those people with limited vocabularies who resort to continual slang and vulgarity...They've simply never been taught how to express themselves in a clearer, better way. They lace their speech with the same, old, tired words and idioms; it's sad, really. My desire for believers is that they would learn how to express themselves precisely and creatively enough not to have to rely on these common (vulgar) expressions.


:goodpost:
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I'll second that! :goodpost::goodpost:


Why not a third :goodpost::goodpost::goodpost:

Seriously, sad to say, I too fall in the same boat of ignorance that Annie and others have expressed and have used this "good grief" in the past as well. Not that I thought it was necessarily appropriate then, but did slip at times - still human, eh? Thanks for this thread 1tim. It's good knowlegde and food for thought.

God Bless,

Futurehope
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Seems a lot of this is nick picking.

By the way, I always mean what I say, but that don't mean the other person understands what I say, to be what I mean for it to mean, many times its hard to communicate to someone what you really mean, do you know what I mean?

Gosh doesn't look the least bit like God. Good grief does not look nothing like God either.

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I am with the last poster. Good grief certainly wouldn't cause me to bat an eyelash. Oh my Gosh, while it is close to Oh my God; honestly, I am on the fence on that one. It's tough to know where to draw the line. We allow our children to say "Oh my gosh". Personally, this is one of the smaller issues in life, and I want to save my words for the bigger ones like drugs, premarital sex, etc. Those are things that I want to step out and make sure our kids know that there is a definite stand.

Part of this theory, for me, is due to my upbringing. I was brought up in a very conservative church that was a lot of "don't do's". Honestly, as a teenager, it was that staunch dogmatic rule based attitude that caused me to turn away from the Church for the better part of 15 years of my life (especially when I noted that a lot of the "don't do" crowd was doing these same things themselves!! :) ). Thankfully, the Lord had a plan and brought me back to the Church just before I turned 30, and I am very thankful He did. I guess I just don't one to be responsible for putting stumbling blocks in front of my children for the little issues.

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I am with the last poster. Good grief certainly wouldn't cause me to bat an eyelash. Oh my Gosh, while it is close to Oh my God; honestly, I am on the fence on that one. It's tough to know where to draw the line. We allow our children to say "Oh my gosh". Personally, this is one of the smaller issues in life, and I want to save my words for the bigger ones like drugs, premarital sex, etc. Those are things that I want to step out and make sure our kids know that there is a definite stand.

Part of this theory, for me, is due to my upbringing. I was brought up in a very conservative church that was a lot of "don't do's". Honestly, as a teenager, it was that staunch dogmatic rule based attitude that caused me to turn away from the Church for the better part of 15 years of my life (especially when I noted that a lot of the "don't do" crowd was doing these same things themselves!! :) ). Thankfully, the Lord had a plan and brought me back to the Church just before I turned 30, and I am very thankful He did. I guess I just don't one to be responsible for putting stumbling blocks in front of my children for the little issues.


Adaram,

You mentioned in another post that you come from an "unsaved" family, so I am going to guess that your parents probably didn't raise you according to God's word and it sounds as though you were in a bit of rebellion as a teenager toward the church anyway. I'm certainly not trying to put down or condemn you or anything of that nature, just offering perspective to your situation. IF you are choosing to raise your children according to God's word, most likely, they won't view you or the church the way that you viewed your parents or the church. They will respect you and honor you. I wouldn't call the "small things" stumbling blocks either - IF your children are being taught right. On the contrary, the younger they learn even the "small stuff", the more easily they will grow and serve the Lord as they age.

Something to think about:

The "small stuff" is what will determine our rewards on judgement day and they are far more eternal than being able to say and do what we want to do here on this earth.

Just my :2cents

BTW, welcome to OB, hope to see you around.

God Bless,

Futurehope
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I am with the last poster. Good grief certainly wouldn't cause me to bat an eyelash. Oh my Gosh, while it is close to Oh my God; honestly, I am on the fence on that one. It's tough to know where to draw the line. We allow our children to say "Oh my gosh". Personally, this is one of the smaller issues in life, and I want to save my words for the bigger ones like drugs, premarital sex, etc. Those are things that I want to step out and make sure our kids know that there is a definite stand.

Part of this theory, for me, is due to my upbringing. I was brought up in a very conservative church that was a lot of "don't do's". Honestly, as a teenager, it was that staunch dogmatic rule based attitude that caused me to turn away from the Church for the better part of 15 years of my life (especially when I noted that a lot of the "don't do" crowd was doing these same things themselves!! :) ). Thankfully, the Lord had a plan and brought me back to the Church just before I turned 30, and I am very thankful He did. I guess I just don't one to be responsible for putting stumbling blocks in front of my children for the little issues.


My Humble Opinion Only, what you rebelled against was God, not church or family. Why blame family and church?
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