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Bakershalfdozen

What Kind of Snake Is This?

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My son found him on our breezeway.

He was only about 12-18 inches long and was not aggressive at all. As I was poking him out the door with a long stick, I got a good look at one of his eyes, and it was round. I'm inclined to think he is a juvenile rat snake. Anyone know for sure?

The camera picked up his markings really well; from a distance, he just looked black.


090tza.jpg

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It looks like a snake that I would not want to meet up with, of course I don't like snakes.

Last summer i went out the back door, turned left went to the edge of of the covered concrete, bent over to trim some grass, looked up and saw a copperhead about 10 feet from my face coming towards me at a high rate of speed.

I quickly jumped back and ran to our storage building grabbed a hoe, I did not have to go all the way back to where I 1st saw him for he was still coming after me, he lost the battle. I've never had a snake come after me like that on land.

In Jesus,
Jerry

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It looks like a snake that I would not want to meet up with, of course I don't like snakes.

Last summer i went out the back door, turned left went to the edge of of the covered concrete, bent over to trim some grass, looked up and saw a copperhead about 10 feet from my face coming towards me at a high rate of speed.

I quickly jumped back and ran to our storage building grabbed a hoe, I did not have to go all the way back to where I 1st saw him for he was still coming after me, he lost the battle. I've never had a snake come after me like that on land.

In Jesus,
Jerry


Ditto! I hate snakes!! :runforhills: (And Bakers, I certainly would never be accused of wanting to get close enough to inspect its eyes to see if they're round or elliptical! No matter how curious I was in wanting to identify it.)

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Ditto! I hate snakes!! :runforhills: (And Bakers, I certainly would never be accused of wanting to get close enough to inspect its eyes to see if they're round or elliptical! No matter how curious I was in wanting to identify it.)


Well, I studied him from a distance long enough before approaching him. I'm not scared of snakes if I know ahead of time that they are not poisonous. All he wanted to do was get away. And judging by his size, he was very, very young.

BTW, our local library had a science exhibition yesterday which I took the kids to. They had a ball python (they're not venomous) there who was very cute and very curious. We all got to pet her, and since she has been handled by humans since she was hatched, she was very tame. The only precaution the lady gave was that if anyone there owned mice or gerbils, they shouldn't approach the snake because she would smell "lunch" on them and try to bite them.

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Ditto! I hate snakes!! :runforhills: (And Bakers, I certainly would never be accused of wanting to get close enough to inspect its eyes to see if they're round or elliptical! No matter how curious I was in wanting to identify it.)


And to think, Bakers pets snakes! :tapping:

My youngest grandson has a pet python, I think he is nuts, his mom is to, for letting him have it.

In Christ Jesus,
Jerry

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My son found him on our breezeway.

He was only about 12-18 inches long and was not aggressive at all. As I was poking him out the door with a long stick, I got a good look at one of his eyes, and it was round. I'm inclined to think he is a juvenile rat snake. Anyone know for sure?

The camera picked up his markings really well; from a distance, he just looked black.


090tza.jpg



What state do you live in?

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Does that earn me a bad rep? :icon_biggrin:


NO! But being as you pet snakes the next time I have on craw up in my yard I'll call.

In Jesus,
Jerry

I've edited my signature, so I'm trying it out to see if I got it edited properly.

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It looks like a snake that I would not want to meet up with, of course I don't like snakes.

Last summer i went out the back door, turned left went to the edge of of the covered concrete, bent over to trim some grass, looked up and saw a copperhead about 10 feet from my face coming towards me at a high rate of speed.

I quickly jumped back and ran to our storage building grabbed a hoe, I did not have to go all the way back to where I 1st saw him for he was still coming after me, he lost the battle. I've never had a snake come after me like that on land.

In Jesus,
Jerry


Ewww!! Copperheads are known to be very aggressive! When we lived on our farm in WV, we were very glad to have black snakes around (they are non-poisonous, although a bite could make you sick). They kept the area clear of copperheads. (Jerry, I would be petrified to go after one!!)

I remember when I worked at Mount Salem Revival Grounds, we stayed in one of the buildings at the top of the (long!) hill. Many a night it was very late when we headed to bed. One of the things that I was really leery of when we got to our cabin was the smell of cucumbers...when there are no cucumbers growing, and you smell them anyway, you can be sure there's a copperhead very close by!!! When we smelled cucumbers, we beat feet into the building!!!!

If I know a snake isn't poisonous, I don't get scared...but I don't wanna pet 'em! *shudder*

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That's a rat snake.


I recently bought a new water hose, I had stretched it out in the yard and had not said nothing to Linda about it. Its black, guess what, she thought there was a very long black snake in our yard. :bugeyes:

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That's a rat snake.


Yes, that is a juvenile rat snake. I checked the list of all snakes of NC and the markings and shape of head match. The site says they are very docile too. You might actually want to let it hang around since it might keep pests out of your house.

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Oh, I didn't kill him; I just shooed him out of our breezeway. He's a good one to have around!

So far, we haven't had any trouble with mice. Our house is brick so that helps, I'm sure.


My 1st cousin, back before he died, found a snake skin in a back corner in his bathroom.

Me, I would never been able to set in a chair & relax or sleep in a bed in that house again from wondering where that snake was.

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It looks like a snake that I would not want to meet up with, of course I don't like snakes.

Last summer i went out the back door, turned left went to the edge of of the covered concrete, bent over to trim some grass, looked up and saw a copperhead about 10 feet from my face coming towards me at a high rate of speed.

I quickly jumped back and ran to our storage building grabbed a hoe, I did not have to go all the way back to where I 1st saw him for he was still coming after me, he lost the battle. I've never had a snake come after me like that on land.

In Jesus,
Jerry


Yikes!! :eek I wouldn't even know what to do if a snake came flying at me! I would probably be paralyzed with fear and be snake dinner. I'm so glad I don't live in a big snake area!

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My son found him on our breezeway.

He was only about 12-18 inches long and was not aggressive at all. As I was poking him out the door with a long stick, I got a good look at one of his eyes, and it was round. I'm inclined to think he is a juvenile rat snake. Anyone know for sure?

The camera picked up his markings really well; from a distance, he just looked black.


090tza.jpg



Like others have said, it's just a little rat snake.

I've never understood why people are afraid of snakes.

I'm a farmer, so snakes are very useful to us. Because they eat the bad insects and pests that destroy our crops, and rats and mice that come into the house, I was brought up to appreciate them from an early age. I was also taught to eat them in the Army (and, yes, they really do taste like chicken).

A few years ago, before my mother built a home on our farm and moved here full time, I was visiting her and doing some chores for her. She was sick and so I offered to come and help her around the house.

I took her dog for a walk along the beautiful creek that runs through her neighborhood when I heard a scream. I ran to see if someone had been hurt and needed help and I found a woman screaming and poking a shovel under her porch at a five foot black snake.

I asked her not to kill it, to let me catch it and let it go, instead.

So I crawled under her porch and got it and when I came out, there were four or five children standing there and they were all backing away and making all the faces children do when they see something they think is "gross".

I asked them if they wanted to pet him and, naturally, they didn't want any part of it. I explained to them that this was a good snake and wouldn't hurt them, how he helps us by eating bugs and mice and rats that would otherwise come into our homes and eat our food and make us sick.

Eventually and very tentatively, they did pet him and the first thing each child said was "I though he'd be slimy". That's a very common misconception people have about snakes.

I showed them how he "smells" the air with his tongue, how he moves by lateral undulation and what we call concertina locomotion, and how he unhines his jaw to swallow very large prey.

We then took him to the creek and let him go. The good news is that I don't think they'll be afraid next time.

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We have 5 poisonous species in my area: Coral snakes, diamondbacks, pigmy rattlers, cottonmouths, and copperheads. What if a kid mistakenly thinks a poisonous species is harmless? From my experience, most people do not know their species of snakes, and those who think they do are usually wrong. My grandfather, for instance, thought brown watersnakes were "water rattlers". DO NOT encourage children or anyone to mess with snakes until they know their species well. If you haven't became absolutely familiar with all the snake species in your area...leave them ALL alone. Be safe.

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What if a kid mistakenly thinks a poisonous species is harmless? We have 5 poisonous species in my area: Coral snakes, diamondbacks, pigmy rattlers, cottonmouths, and copperheads. From my experience, most people do not know their species of snakes, and those who think they do are usually wrong. My grandfather, for instance, thought brown watersnakes were "water rattlers". I once picked up a scarlet king snake from under a log and my brother in law freaked because he thought I was handling a coral snake. DO NOT encourage children or anyone to mess with snakes until they know their species well. My advice, is that if you haven't became absolutely familiar with all the snake species in your area...leave them ALL alone. Be safe.


You don't have to be familiar with all snake species. If you know that it's a black snake, then you know that it's safe. If you know that it's a rat snake, then you know that it's safe. And so on...

If you don't know what it is, then you use discretion with it.

We live out in the woods and my chidlren are confronted with snakes all the time. They know that if they don't know what it is, be careful around it.

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"black" snakes?
We have about 4 species in my area which can be black; Black racers, black hognose snakes, and black water snakes called "mud snakes" (solid black with red bands on the underbelly). But Cottomouth moccasins can sometimes be very black too. Do your kids know the difference?

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"black" snakes?
We have about 4 species in my area which can be black; Black racers, black hognose snakes, and black water snakes called "mud snakes" (solid black with red bands on the underbelly). But Cottomouth moccasins can sometimes be very black too. Do your kids know the difference?


Yep.

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We always knew when it was a "black" snake - and weren't afraid of them because they weren't poisonous. I think kids who grow up around snakes learn pretty quickly the ones which are poisonous and the ones which aren't.

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