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Bakershalfdozen

Eating Soups

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I am not much into soup ,but when we were at my in laws we did buy some cheddar ,bacon soup at the Amish store.
You just take some of that and add water and it was pretty good .

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This week I'm eating homemade potato soup

Cub (peel if desired - I don't) 6 to 8 potatoes (I use Idaho)
Boil for about 20 minutes or so until soft, but not mushy
Drain water, leaving about 1 inch
Cover in milk
Add a can of Campbell's Cheddar Cheese soup
Add 1 stick of butter
Season to taste (salt, pepper, garlic, onion, seasoning salt)
Simmer until well mixed and heated through
If it is too thin for you, you may mash some of the potatoes (as I do sometimes) or add instant potato flakes (as my friend who gave me the recipe does)
If desired, serve with bacon and/or corn bread.

This time I chopped some onion and garlic and sauteed them and put in the soup - YUMMY :-)

Ramba29

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I have to go with bean with bacon soup. Every time I get sick (like just last week), my taste buds automatically gear up for B&B soup and a PB& apple jelly sandwich.

Mitch

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We aren't about to eat store-boughten soups as they are purchased only to be used as sauces. We get the cream soups by Campbells, and my favorite and most versatile is Cream of Mushroom. :D

My wife's homemade soups are as follows:

1. Chicken-Corn (includes saffron and wide noodles)

2. Beef-Vegetable (save the broths from your veggies and store them in the freezer)

3. Potato with hard-boiled eggs in it

4. Chili with Brown rice

5. Ham and 15-Bean (we use a ham-hock)

6. Chicken with Brown Rice (my wife says not even to attempt a chicken recipe without Saffron. :mrgreen: )

7. Tomato Stew (my own concoction, my wife says it's too hot and spicy. :lol: :lol: :lol: )

Her soups and stews are by far the world's best and everyone raves about them. The recipes are available if anyone desires. :D

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Hehehhehehehhhe,

Be most happy to do that, Bakers-6. :D :D :D :D

I hafta run off to my project right now, but will be back later today and type them in.

Trust me on this, you're gonna think you've died and gone to Heaven they are that good.

:clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap :clap

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It turns out my wife just puts these things together from the top of her head, and just to show you how good they are, you'll really have to run out to the store and get some ingredients and try them out. This first one is ideal at this time of year to chase away colds and their symptoms. Don't ask me why that is, but yea verily it is true indeed. :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

[quote]
1. Chicken-Corn (includes saffron and wide noodles)
[/quote]

[b]1. [/b]In your six-quart kettle, place three complete chicken legs and thighs. Cover them with enough fresh water to bring the pot to one half to two thirds full. We like to get them with as much of the fat and skin removed to cut down on the labor.

[b]2. [/b] Put into the pot 1 cup chopped celery, 1 medium-size chopped onion, 1 Tablespoon parsley, [b]1 small pinch saffron (((Do not skip this ingredient.)))[/b], and 1-1/2 teaspoons chicken boullion. Salt and pepper to taste.

[b]3. [/b] Bring pot to boil, then turn back to simmer. Continue simmering until the chicken is falling off the bones.

[b]4. [/b] Remove all of the chicken for de-boning and dicing.

[b]5. [/b]Put a good-sized handfull of your favorite brand of wide egg noodles into the pot. We prefer[b] Little Barn[/b](TM), they are Pennsylvania-Dutch. Also put two pints of frozen corn (from your freezer that you processed late last summer) into the broth and simmer until completely thawed and mixed. Ideally, this corn should be home-processed for best results. [i][b]The store-boughten canned or frozen whole kernel corn is just simply no good at all.[/b] (((Honestly, that stuff isn't worth the time to take it home even if someone gave it to you. :lol: :lol: :lol: )))[/i]

[i][b]--OR--[/b][/i]

If you don't have it in your freezer, then get six to eight good roasting ears from the supermarket. Husk and silk the ears. Then with a [b]razor sharp butcher knife[/b] cut the kernels half-off (i.e. just skim the tops of the kernels with your big knife.), then with the back of a butter knife scrape the cob really well to get the rest of the "good stuff" out. You'll need about a quart of this. Put this mix into the pot, and simmer till the corn and noodles are fully tender (about twenty-five minutes)

[b]6. [/b]When the chicken is fully separated from the bones and sliced and diced, put it back into the pot. Simmer for another ten minutes or so, and serve piping hot with [i][b]multi-grain[/b][/i] Premium (TM) saltines.

This is some serious comfort food.

ENJOY!!!

[i](((More to follow later.)))[/i]

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[quote]
7. Tomato Stew (my own concoction, my wife says it's too hot and spicy. )
[/quote]

This was copied over from another thread from long ago, but is [b]very versatile as a soup or stew[/b]. I try to keep some in the freezer at all times, and enjoy a bit of it every day. If it's made really well, we never tire of it. [i](((We --> You, me and the frog in my pocket. :lol: Not my wife, she doesn't like it.)))[/i]:mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

[quote]
[b]Spaghetti Sauce: The commericially available sauces always give me heartburn, so I thought I'd try to formulate my own. For you ladies that know your way around the kitchen quite well and have a way with the culinary arts, this may seem rather elementary. Still, maybe somebody will benefit.

Start with regular Tomato Paste:::

1. To give a little more bite, or kick, add salsa.
For a six quart kettle, I added two 16 ounce jars.

2. When adding browned and drained ground beef, apply MOORE"S LAW::: If a little is good, then more is better, and way, way too much is just right!!!

3. When adding chopped onion, chopped green peppers, mushrooms, Italian seasonings and garlic, apply Moore's Law.

4. If making a six-quart kettle full, add one cup of grape-jelly, black-berry jelly, or some other mild flavored jelly. Honest to goodness, there will be no heartburn. I think the sugar neutralizes it.

5. Add grated Parmesan Cheese. (About a 1-1/2 cups for this batch.)

Simmer on lowest heat all night long.

I don't wanna brag, But I thot it tasted pretty good. My wife said it tasted too strong. Oh well, can't please everybody.[/b]
[/quote]

On a side note::::
[i]
(((It seems that in America, and for what reason I don't know, there is a strong possibility that men over fifty will contract prostate cancer. It's practically a 100% chance if we live long enough. My wife and I subscribe to the Health report by Dr. Williams who says that for every disease known to man, somewhere in this world there is a place where it doesn't exist among the populace. It just so happens that cooked tomato sauce is the best natural hedge/deterrant (not cure, by any means) against cancer of the prostate. So then, when we go over to European countries that use a lot of tomato sauce in their daily diets we find that prostate cancer is exceedingly rare.)))[/i]

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Most excellent, Bakers-6, :D

Another one will be forthcoming as soon as my wife tells me how it's done.

[i]
(((I had originally hoped that she would have these things written down, but she just makes them as she goes. :D :D :D )))[/i]

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A quick note to you all:::: :D

Your comments are more than welcome, here. I imagine you also have soup and stew recipes that you really like. By all means share. :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

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Jim, I'm a bumbler in the kitchen, but your spaghetti sauce recipe sounds good. So here's my stupid question:

Did you start with two 16-oz jars of tomato paste, or did you add two 16-oz jars of salsa to six quarts of tomato paste?

Mitch

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Hi Chevvie, :D

Yea verily, my goofs have found me. I forgot to specify how much of that good stuff (tomato paste). :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

It depends on your pot. I use my [b]12 quart stock-pot [/b]when I make this stuff.

Whatever size pot you use, [b]fill 2/3 full with tomato paste.[/b] Then put the other ingredients in until it's within two inches from the top. As it's cooking and simmering gently, by all means take some and enjoy it. :D :D :D :D . Then just add more tomato paste to bring the level back up. Stir occasionally, b/c it may stick to the bottom in a pot that big. [b] By all means go heavy on the ground beef. [/b] MOORE'S LAW applies here. See above. :)

This is one recipe that is ideal in the summer time, b/c of all the tomatoes we have growing in the garden. We can make our own paste with our Victorio strainer.

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