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Bakershalfdozen

Year-Round Schooling

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I went to school year round starting freshman year. The pros would be that you get two weeks off every six weeks. The cons are that, if you play sports, you still have to practice and play games during the off time (so it's hard to plan for vacations).

The scheduled breaks were similar to this, if I remember right:

Two weeks in the spring (normal spring break plus an extra week)

Two weeks in the summer (last week of June, first week of July)

Two weeks in the fall (mid October)

Two weeks in the winter (week of Christmas and the week afterwards)

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If you are homeschooling, I probably wouldn't do it if your kids see other kids having fun.. but they may not mind if schooling is shorter all year, or the get a month break or so.

Or you can teach science in the summer and just have fun with it.

btw, vacations are cheaper from Oct. - May.. and less busy, so if you took a break between those months, you will save money on vacations and have less stress.

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Some year round schools have three months on, one month off.

I think a pro for this would be that children wouldn't forget things so easily. When I was teaching school, I would spend a good couple of weeks reviewing basics from the previous year. And kids do tend to forget a good bit of stuff over the summer - younger kids, especially.

A con would be like jon said - sport practice would of course have to continue and vacations would be hard, although if vacation were only a couple of weeks, coaches could learn to work around it.

Personally, I don't think it's a bad idea. But it could play real havoc with parents' schedules - having to find a sitter or something, if both parents work, for just a bit of time evey few weeks or months could pose a problem.

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To each his own..................personally, I happen to LOVE my summer vacation, and the longer the better! :lol:

Oh, I just realized you wanted pros and cons for year round schooling:

pros: ah, more consistent?

cons: less fun! :Bleh

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To each his own..................personally' date=' I happen to LOVE my summer vacation, and the longer the better! :lol:[/quote']

Me too. My best memories always occurred in the summer.. camping, lazy days, fireflies, stars in the night, swimming, fireworks, playing sports like baseball, etc. Thats why science and sports ought to be taught in the summer if you want to teach in the summer.

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VIVA LA SUMMER BREAK!!!! I personally cannot imagine not enjoying summer to the fullest. Forget the kids...I would be the one aching to get outside. Of course, we live at a camp where everyone else is swimming, tubing the creek, playing mini golf, going on hikes, riding the waterslide and giant swing, boating, roasting marshmallows, playing frisbee golf, and doing tons of other fun outdoor stuff. Forget it--we can't have school in the summer. I don't even usually start up until September.

HOWEVER...All that said, we do "maintain" in the summer; it's not a "free-for all." The kids do worksheets every morning from BJU Press's Vacation Stations. And, they run a lemonade stand, which has proved to be educational. (They make the treats, buy the mix, make the lemonade, decide what to charge, and make change for their customers.) Also, we do the summer reading program at our library, which makes them read for at least twenty minutes a day (they usually get caught up in the books and read for longer). AND...they do keep going to music lessons, and they perform two special musical numbers every week for the junior campers that are here. (And my oldest is actually going to camp for the first time!)

We really do appreciate (NEED) the change of pace summer brings. Around the middle of the summer, I start getting inspired for the next year...decorating the school room, studying, organizing, etc. I feel like having three months off gives me a chance to recharge and get refreshed, as well as providing different kinds of educational opportunities for the kids. I'm afraid I'd get burned out if I went year round.

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Personally I don't have any children school aged yet, but my husband and plan on either having them do school one day a week in summer, or else giving them either one major summer project or a couple smaller ones. This is so that they aren't entirely rusty when school starts up again in earnest. It would be a special project in their field of interest so that they would find some pleasure in it.

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We homeschool and we do "school" during the summer but it's limited, focused and not something that keeps the kids from enjoying and doing other things during the summer.

For the most part, during the summer months we either have them do just a bit to help them build up a weak area or just a bit to keep stuff fresh in their minds. This typically just takes a small amount of time and other than the summer library reading program, the kids spend most of the summer outdoors like "normal" (yeah, right!) kids :Green

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My stepmom teaches public school in Utah and they go year round. She likes it because then she gets to have vacations four times per year to go visit her daughters or go somewhere with my dad.

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We finish April 18th and will start up again on Aug. 15th. We would not have it any other way. My wife wants the time off and I don't believe the pros would outway the cons for us. That doesn't mean it wouldn't work for someone else.

We know a family who does school 6 days a week, takes December off and then does 5 days a week and ends in April. Whatever works.

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We have to be in school 186 days a year (6 hours a day, not including lunch). Our school day runs from 8:30 AM to 3:00 PM. Generally, we start 2 weeks before Labor Day (half days for the first 2 weeks) and end the Friday before Memorial Day. We take 2 days off for Thanksgiving and 2 weeks off for Christmas. We don't normally take a Spring Break.

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I guess I tend to be a traditionalist in this area. I think I would miss the summer break as well.

That's where I am too. :thumb

I think it was set up this way so kids could help in the family garden and on the farm in summer time.

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That's where I am too. :thumb

I think it was set up this way so kids could help in the family garden and on the farm in summer time.

You're probably right. But I seem to remember that Laura Ingalls and her contemporaries went to school in the summer and took their "farm helping" break during harvest time.

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I have homeschooled for 1.5 yrs now year round out of necessity. We take off when we need a break are sick or traveling. We are not traditional homeschoolers. I choose to do only 3 subjects during the traditional school year Reading, English, Math. Then do History, Science and bookreports during the summer months. Much less stress for me. K-4 -1st were fine, but 3rd and 4th about did me in trying to finish everything in 1day and do housework and take care of the younger ones. Personally, traditional homeschooling only works if your husband has time to help, mine dosen't.

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I have homeschooled for 1.5 yrs now year round out of necessity. We take off when we need a break are sick or traveling. We are not traditional homeschoolers. I choose to do only 3 subjects during the traditional school year Reading' date=' English, Math. Then do History, Science and bookreports during the summer months. Much less stress for me. K-4 -1st were fine, but 3rd and 4th about did me in trying to finish everything in 1day and do housework and take care of the younger ones. Personally, traditional homeschooling only works if your husband has time to help, mine dosen't.[/quote']That's a really interesting approach, Trish. I'm glad it works for you. I know what you mean about husbands helping out. Mine doesn't help at all; he typically works 60-70 hours a week. It has been a challenge for me to get everything done, too. (I have three in school; two of them are studying nine subjects. Fortunately, it has worked for me to combine them in Bible, history, and science.) My kids really do help out with housework a lot, but the laundry is what always gets me down. :yawn:

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Want a simply solution to your school calender problems: BOARDING SCHOOL!

All it takes is some planning and saving in advance and you can have those little pest shipped off to a highly disciplined christian school that can all but insure them admission to the college of their choice. Some schools are even starting to allow boarders for grades 6-8, so you can start them young.

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Want a simply solution to your school calender problems: BOARDING SCHOOL!

All it takes is some planning and saving in advance and you can have those little pest shipped off to a highly disciplined christian school that can all but insure them admission to the college of their choice. Some schools are even starting to allow boarders for grades 6-8, so you can start them young.



HA! Don't think it hasn't crossed my mind.... Seriously, If God wanted someone other than my hubby and I to train our kids, He would have given them to someone else. (Note: if one can afford a decent christian day school, I have no problem with that)

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Trish: I agree that parents should be "training" their kids. But there are just somethings that most parents aren't qualified to do. For example, my mother nor father had the back ground in math, physics, or chemistry to teach me the things I needed to know in order to achieve the scores I needed to get into an appropriate college. And, for the most part, my parents pretty much had their values instilled in me by the time I left for school (I was 14 when I actually left home for good). I'm sure I was able to transition from prep school to college so well in part because I had been in a college like atmosphere for four years of high school. There was no "finally I'm free" feelings that led me to do things I felt like I had been kept from doing by my parents. Plus, in my own experience, children that boarded do better in college and get into better grad schools.

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College isn't even important for our family as we will be teaching our daughter to stay at home until marriage and teach our son that he should only go to college if he is sure it is God's will because college is NOT the be all and end all people make it out to be.

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I agree that college isn't for everyone. Plus, if your kids don't feel like that's were God wants them, then it's nothing more than an expensive mistake. However, I do believe that some form of skill is needed if one is going to raise a family over the poverty line, especially considering the direction our economy is currently headed. I mean, you (everyone in general or at least the head of the house hold) has to work and employers tend to want to hire educated and/or skilled employees. If jobs keep getting sent over seas and businesses keep closing due to the lagging economy, then the only jobs available will be filled with the most qualified. There just won't be any jobs available for the unskilled or uneducated.

You also have to consider that God wants godly men and women serving as lawyers, doctors, teachers . . . And you have to go to college to qualify for those professions. Considering your child probably won't be able to discern God's will for them until they are mature enough, it's probably best to prepare them for college just in case that is God's will for them.

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I don't believe in "preparing them for college" I believe in preparing them for real life. There are plenty of ways to make good wages and none of the ones I'm thinking of require college. We will raise our children in this mindset from the start, and show them how they can make it. College won't be a "norm" for this family.

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MrsW: That sounds like a good plan. I would just make sure they are prepared with some skill (whether it's being a barber or a janitor). Your right, you don't need a college degree to earn a living, but it sure helps. For instance, I want a large family, so that means I'll need a fairly large income to provide for them sufficiently, while also investing for me and my spouse in retirement (nothing worse than accepting government handouts, IMO). The best way I can see for me to make sure I am going to be able to afford a large family, was for me to get a good education. Plus, my parents were 100% against supporting (financially) me post prep school if I didn't go to college.

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I agree that college isn't for everyone. Plus, if your kids don't feel like that's were God wants them, then it's nothing more than an expensive mistake. However, I do believe that some form of skill is needed if one is going to raise a family over the poverty line, especially considering the direction our economy is currently headed. I mean, you (everyone in general or at least the head of the house hold) has to work and employers tend to want to hire educated and/or skilled employees. If jobs keep getting sent over seas and businesses keep closing due to the lagging economy, then the only jobs available will be filled with the most qualified. There just won't be any jobs available for the unskilled or uneducated.

You also have to consider that God wants godly men and women serving as lawyers, doctors, teachers . . . And you have to go to college to qualify for those professions. Considering your child probably won't be able to discern God's will for them until they are mature enough, it's probably best to prepare them for college just in case that is God's will for them.


:amen::amen::amen: I agree with this! I don't want my sons struggling to put food on the table for my grandbabies because there was no foresight on his part. We don't believe mothers should work outside the home except in drastic situations.....therefore, we are encouraging every single one of our sons (4 of them) to go to college, and get at least a BS or higher. I'm hoping that the Lord will call at least one of them into the ministry, but that is His decision, not mine. We will not discourage our daughters, either, but would prefer them to go to Christian College instead. We'll see.

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