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DaveW

Hunting yummy things

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23 hours ago, Jim_Alaska said:

Chicken breast is not comparable to wild bird breast like grouse. But most Grouse is dark meat, as I said. The one exception is Ruffed Grouse, their breast meat is white, but not dry like chicken. The darkest wild bird meat is Ptarmigan, it is a very dark, blood red color.

I have never noticed chicken to be dry.   Those who do lunch when we have a fellowship lunch always roast it covered with foil.  I find it very greasy like that.  I usually  score the skin with a sharp knife, prick under the legs and wings, then rub in a little olive oil and some ground bay leaf and ground celery and a little powdered garlic.   Very tasty and I don't find it dry, like turkey.    Sorry nothing to do with hunting but there is no hunting around here but rabbits as far as I know, 

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Invicta, I think that when people talk about chicken being dry they are talking about the white meat breast being dryer than the dark meat. I never cover chicken when roasting. The skin being browned makes chicken very flavorful. I also prick under  the legs and wings when the bird is almost done, this allows the juices to drain and makes for very flavorful gravy. I love chicken gravy.

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That's a purty double shovel reindeer Jim and hunting them is for the hardiest of individuals!  I'm afraid my constitution would never allow that again!  All the hunting I do these days is with a camera:

STC_0018.thumb.JPG.276a0dfd9f33612e3f94908aa50887ec.JPG

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OK, now getting back to seasonal harvesting in Alaska, after the long mid-winter wait not much else is harvested until the fishing season. Because of the immense size of the state seasons can vary a lot. For the most part the seasons for fishing are self regulating. That means that you can take them at any time. Weather usually prevents you in winter. So you are limited to Spring, Summer and Fall. Many times seasons are also limited for species like Salmon because they only return to the rivers and bays when it is time to reproduce.

Some species are year round residents but only accessible after winter is over, unless you like fishing through the ice, which I don't. I didn't do much salt water fishing because the coast was so far away from where I lived. But I usually made a couple of trips per summer. These trips were for Halibut and Silver Salmon.

Halibut is also call chicken of the sea for its flavor. Not that it tastes like chicken, but because it is so good. probably no other fish can compare to halibut for flavor. They can get very large, but the best for eating is in the 20-30 pound range.

Image result for alaska halibut fishing

Silver, or Coho Salmon are more than plentiful and fun to catch for recreational or subsistence fishermen.

Alaska Silver Salmon Fishing

They are also a major source of income for commercial fishermen as evidenced by this net full of Silvers taken by a "Purse Seiner." 

fish4.jpg

There are also other salt water fish to be had such as Cod, which are also plentiful. Fishing for Cod and Halibut is interesting and the scenery is spectacular, but the actual fishing is a bit boring. Halibut and Cod are usually taken at tiring depths. 100-150 feet is not uncommon. The changing of tides creates strong currents so you have to use at least a one pound weight to keep the bait on the bottom.  So even if you don't have a fish on yet, but want to check to see if the bait is still there, you have to crank two pounds of lead up 150 feet just to check the bait. This kind of fishing is done from a boat in the open ocean. You can sit there for hours on end with nothing happening, that's why I said Halibut fishing can be boring.

Fishing for Coho Salmon on the other hand is fast and furious, they travel in large schools and you use artificial lures, not bait.

I'll make another post in relation to fresh water fishing, which I did  a lot of. My fingers get tired of typing since I only use three of them, I am not an accomplished typist to say the least.

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I like fishing and find it relaxing , rather than boring.

I actually enjoy the act of fishing more than the catching....... but of course I don't rely on it for food.

I am actually happy to catch nothing, just so long as I get some quiet fishing in.

Fishing with kids is NEVER relaxing. :8_laughing:

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Bro. Dave, I didn't mean that fishing was boring. I just meant that Halibut fishing was boring. It is entirely possible to sit in a boat all day and not even get a nibble. If you get a fish it is worth all the boring, but otherwise it makes for a long day on the ocean confined to a gently rocking boat.

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3 hours ago, Jim_Alaska said:

Bro. Dave, I didn't mean that fishing was boring. I just meant that Halibut fishing was boring. It is entirely possible to sit in a boat all day and not even get a nibble. If you get a fish it is worth all the boring, but otherwise it makes for a long day on the ocean confined to a gently rocking boat.

Yep, I get that - but that is exactly the point for me - sometimes the sitting is "interrupted" by the catching.

But other days, I want the catching....... depends on my mood. :4_13_14:

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OK, to continue on we’ll look at fresh water fishing and harvesting fish for the family. For my family, fish made up a substantial part of our diet. They are plentiful, free and a great source of harvestable food. Most, but not all of the fish we put in the freezer came from my own fishing efforts. But in the salmon season I could go to native fish wheels and buy salmon very cheaply. As I remember I could buy salmon from the native fishermen for $2 per fish. These are whole Salmon that we had to clean and fillet. My wife would can some of this fish and use it just like we do for Tuna. It is great for sandwiches or chowder.

Some people would consider what I write next as almost a sacrilege. Dog mushing is very popular in Alaska as both recreation as well as a means of transportation. This is where sled dogs are harnessed to a sled and used to transport both people and things like firewood and supplies.

I mention this because Salmon is a major source of food for these dogs. The dog musher will buy or harvest Salmon, grind it up into twenty pound blocks and cook it in water to be served to the dogs in hot water in winter. It is also favored for taking along the trail when traveling overnight, because they can take a whole salmon and just saw off pieces to throw to the dogs when they camp for the night. Now this has nothing to do with my harvest of fish, but I just thought that it would interest some folks because it is something most people never hear of.

Dog+cart+ride.jpg

Where I lived most fishing is done in rivers and lakes. There are many species to choose from in these environments. Some of them are;

Rainbow Trout

Rainbow Trout.jpg

 

Lake Trout
Lake.jpg
 

Grayling

Grayling.jpg


Arctic Char

Char.jpg
 

Dolly Varden

Dolly Varden.jpg


 Sheefish

Sheefish.jpg

Pike

hangingfish.jpg

 

 

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Here is a bit of a quiz for an early Sunday morning. I have to get ready for church, but was going over posts on this thread and thought I would ask this question.

In the picture below we see that the picture has been taken at the exact moment of bullet impact. So the quiz question is this: How would you take a picture in this manner at the exact time the bullet impacted? I know how I would do it because I took this picture, but how would you do it?

weary warrior will probably come up with the answer, he's like that.  :8_laughing:

moose4.jpg

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9 minutes ago, Jim_Alaska said:

Here is a bit of a quiz for an early Sunday morning. I have to get ready for church, but was going over posts on this thread and thought I would ask this question.

In the picture below we see that the picture has been taken at the exact moment of bullet impact. So the quiz question is this: How would you take a picture in this manner at the exact time the bullet impacted? I know how I would do it because I took this picture, but how would you do it?

weary warrior will probably come up with the answer, he's like that.  :8_laughing:

moose4.jpg

Now that's what I'd like to know. It seems almost impossible, but obviously it's not. I would like to know. 

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3 hours ago, Jim_Alaska said:

Here is a bit of a quiz for an early Sunday morning. I have to get ready for church, but was going over posts on this thread and thought I would ask this question.

In the picture below we see that the picture has been taken at the exact moment of bullet impact. So the quiz question is this: How would you take a picture in this manner at the exact time the bullet impacted? I know how I would do it because I took this picture, but how would you do it?

weary warrior will probably come up with the answer, he's like that.  :8_laughing:

moose4.jpg

If I was there by myself, I would video the shot, then grab that one frame from the video. However, according to the date on the picture, there would have been limited tech in 1991. So, I'm stumped too.

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Well WW, you had it on the money but talked yourself out of it. It was a video taken with one of the old, huge video cameras that used a VHS tape. I did grab that one frame  and what you see is the result.

I just knew you would get it. Unfortunately there is no prize  .  :sorry:

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1 hour ago, Jim_Alaska said:

Well WW, you had it on the money but talked yourself out of it. It was a video taken with one of the old, huge video cameras that used a VHS tape. I did grab that one frame  and what you see is the result.

I just knew you would get it. Unfortunately there is no prize  .  :sorry:

I assumed it was from video, but when he pointed out the date, I fell into line with his thinking.

Basically - "that Jim bloke is pretty amazingly good with a camera - and a rifle!":laugh:

 

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In the Ashdown forest there is a cull of deer as many have been killed by collisions with cars, and one motorist has been killed by collision with a deer.  There has been outrage by the animal lobby who say there should be a low speed limit through the forest. 

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If course there should be a low speed limit. That would allow more deer to live. More deer alive equates to less food for them, which in turn leads to deer death by starvation. The animal lobby never thinks these things through to their logical conclusion.

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On ‎4‎/‎02‎/‎2018 at 6:18 AM, swathdiver said:

I know a fellow on a muzzleloading forum who lives in Australia and hunts regularly and even takes those wild donkeys and mules, forgot what y'all call them.

Sorry I missed this first time around.

Yeah, we call em........... donkeys and mules......:laugh:

Wild horses here are called brumbies (brumby - singular), but they are proper horses - generally smaller and stong rather than fast, but they are introduced (early years of European settlement), went wild, and are now just about extinct due to people crowding them out and farmers locking up pasture lands.

 

I have in the past known people who were involved in muzzle loading - I am pretty sure they would be allowed under current Aussie laws.

I used to know a guy (friend of my father's) who started making replica firearms, and ended up making competition pistols - Olympic grade - in his backyard shed!

But he was never a shooter at all - never hunted anything at any time, and I don't think he ever even fired on a range. His interest was purely technical, and so, his technical skill allowed him to make excellent replicas and competition weapons.

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We don't have any caribou here in Florida, but I hope to put some whitetails in the freezer with my new .300 AAC "blackout". A .300 blk is good for deer-sized game at ranges of 100 meters or less, which is fine in moist cases for around here and you can convert a standard AR15  in 5.56 NATO or .223 to a .300AAC simply by swapping out the barrel... I completely built this one from parts from 4 different companies. 

blackout (2).jpg

Edited by heartstrings

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Pretty neat.  I miss my Remington 700 BDL in .30-06.  My shoulder doesn't though!  Someday I might like another in .243 Winchester or 6mm Remington.  Or maybe .257 Roberts.

I'm more partial to muzzleloaders now, especially the double barrel shotguns and cap and ball pistols.

 

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Yes, a 30.06 bolt action kicks like a mule. But you can put together something like a 6.5 Creedmore or .308 on an AR10 platform (sort of like a "stretched" AR15), add a muzzle brake and have a longer-range deer rifle with significantly lower recoil. The buffer/spring design, inside the tube of an AR15 stock, serves as an effective shock absorber and the added muzzle brake uses some of the gasses exiting the barrel to "push" the barrel forward which counteracts some of the backward push of the recoil.

Edited by heartstrings

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9 hours ago, swathdiver said:

Pretty neat.  I miss my Remington 700 BDL in .30-06.  My shoulder doesn't though!  Someday I might like another in .243 Winchester or 6mm Remington.  Or maybe .257 Roberts.

I'm more partial to muzzleloaders now, especially the double barrel shotguns and cap and ball pistols.

 

I have a 6mm Remington I have owned for more years than I care to say. Wonderful caliber for medium size game, flat shooting and great velocity.

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18 hours ago, Jim_Alaska said:

I have a 6mm Remington I have owned for more years than I care to say. Wonderful caliber for medium size game, flat shooting and great velocity.

Cool.  I would enjoy hand loading and target shooting with it.  It is a better cartridge as it holds slightly more powder, though more expensive to shoot.

Still having too much fun, when I get to shoot, with making smoke with black powder! 

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