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Was Simon the Sorcerer saved?

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Bob from England
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Simon was saved.  How could it read any other way?

Verse 9 tells us that Simon's sorcery was past, he didn't do it anymore.

Verse 11 tells us that his actions are past tense, not doing it anymore.

Verses 12 and 13 show that people that held Simon in high regard believed on the Lord (Got Saved) and were Baptized and he did likewise.  It reads no other way.

Verses 18-24 show as Heartstrings pointed out, this man sinned and was rebuked and he made repentance and did not want to do wrong.  Admitting and not wanting to do wrong is a sign of being saved.  In Proverbs it says the wise in heart receive commandments.  Simon did because he was.

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10 hours ago, swathdiver said:

Simon was saved.  How could it read any other way?

Verse 9 tells us that Simon's sorcery was past, he didn't do it anymore.

Verse 11 tells us that his actions are past tense, not doing it anymore.

Verses 12 and 13 show that people that held Simon in high regard believed on the Lord (Got Saved) and were Baptized and he did likewise.  It reads no other way.

Verses 18-24 show as Heartstrings pointed out, this man sinned and was rebuked and he made repentance and did not want to do wrong.  Admitting and not wanting to do wrong is a sign of being saved.  In Proverbs it says the wise in heart receive commandments.  Simon did because he was.

Many thanks for your helpful reply.

When I first read this back in the 1970s I thought that he wasn't truly saved. 

However, as I've looked into my own heart and life, and seen how many times I've come short, I can see that, yes, he was truly saved but in need of repentance which he duly exhibited.

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Simon wasn't saved until he heard Philip's message and believed.  Nor were the people that had previously had high regard for Simon.  They were bewitched by Simon,'s sorceries and believed them to be a power from God.

When PHilip preached to them, they believed.  At that point they were saved and were subsequently baptized.

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Invicta. The Bible says that old Brother Simon "believed". Have you ever sinned or been "overtaken in a fault"? I have. He was rebuked, bro, and instead of rebelling, he repented in fear and asked for prayer. Sounds like a brother in Christ to me.

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53 minutes ago, heartstrings said:

Invicta. The Bible says that old Brother Simon "believed". Have you ever sinned or been "overtaken in a fault"? I have. He was rebuked, bro, and instead of rebelling, he repented in fear and asked for prayer. Sounds like a brother in Christ to me.

But he didn't pray for himself.  I have had people at work who asked me to pray for them. But they were certainly not saved.

Edited by Invicta
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I find Peter's reply to Simon when asked to sell the gift of the Holy Spirit somewhat interesting.

"Thy money perish with thee..."

This is and interesting statement, since, those who are saved aren't truly "perishing".

Why those exact words by Peter?  Shouldn't Peter have known whether Simon was saved or not?

If Simon was saved, why the statement?  Why not just, "Thou canst not purchase this gift"?

The text seems to imply Salvation (he believed) but then seems to imply Salvation was not acquired after all.

Edited by Standing Firm In Christ
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Not totally sold on that, since the Apostle Paul makes a distinction between those who perish and those who are saved.

1 Corinthians 1:18 For the preaching of the cross is to them that perish foolishness; but unto us which are saved it is the power of God.

And every post-crucifixion verse that uses the word "perish" is attributing it with the lost.

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18 minutes ago, Standing Firm In Christ said:

The Greek word used for "perish" in Acts 8:20 is translated as "damnable" and "destruction" in 2 Peter 2:1.  It is translated "pernicious ways"; "of perdition" and "waste" in other verses.

I don't see the word being attributed to the saved of God.

1 Timothy 6:9-10 -- "But they that will be rich fall into temptation and a snare, and into many foolish and hurtful lusts, which drown men in destruction and perdition [Greek noun - "apoleia"].  For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows."

So then, the warning of 1 Timothy 6:9-10 must not be applicable unto genuine believers, since the result is not possible for believers???????

2 Peter 3:16 -- "As also in all his epistles, speaking in them of these things; in which are some things hard to be understood, which they that are unlearned and unstable wrest, as they do also the other scriptures, unto their own destruction [Greek noun - "apoleia"]."

So then, the warning of 2 Peter 3:16 must not be applicable unto genuine believers, since the result is not possible for believers???????

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The Greek verb "apollumi" is the Greek verb form in unity with the Greek noun "apoleia."

Roman 14:15 -- "But if thy brother be grieved with thy meat, now walkest thou not charitably.  Destroy [present, active, imperative of the Greek verb "apollumi"] not him with thy meat, for whom Christ died."

This certainly appears to apply unto genuine believers.

1 Corinthians 8:11 -- "And through thy knowledge shall the weak brother perish [future, middle, indicative of the Greek verb "apollumi"], for whom Christ died?"

This certainly appears to apply unto genuine believers.  (By the way, this also indicates that the English word "perish" is indeed used "in a post-resurrection verse" for genuine believers)

4 minutes ago, Standing Firm In Christ said:

I have to do with what the text of Acts 8:20 says.  Simon was heading toward destruction.  If he did not repent,, he certainly would find it.

Indeed.  If he did not repent, he certainly would end in some form of destruction, but not necessarily in hell's destruction.

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12 minutes ago, Standing Firm In Christ said:

I disagree. 

the Greek used in Acts 8:20 is only used in conjunction with the destruction of the lost.

44 minutes ago, Pastor Scott Markle said:

1 Timothy 6:9-10 -- "But they that will be rich fall into temptation and a snare, and into many foolish and hurtful lusts, which drown men in destruction and perdition [Greek noun - "apoleia"].  For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows."

So then, the warning of 1 Timothy 6:9-10 must not be applicable unto genuine believers, since the result is not possible for believers???????

2 Peter 3:16 -- "As also in all his epistles, speaking in them of these things; in which are some things hard to be understood, which they that are unlearned and unstable wrest, as they do also the other scriptures, unto their own destruction [Greek noun - "apoleia"]."

So then, the warning of 2 Peter 3:16 must not be applicable unto genuine believers, since the result is not possible for believers???????

 

12 minutes ago, Standing Firm In Christ said:

Romans 14:16 uses an entirely different Greek word for "Destroy" and does not mean the same as in Acts 8:20.

29 minutes ago, Pastor Scott Markle said:

The Greek verb "apollumi" is the Greek verb form in unity with the Greek noun "apoleia." (emphasis added by Pastor Scott Markle)

Roman 14:15 -- "But if thy brother be grieved with thy meat, now walkest thou not charitably.  Destroy [present, active, imperative of the Greek verb "apollumi"] not him with thy meat, for whom Christ died."

This certainly appears to apply unto genuine believers.

1 Corinthians 8:11 -- "And through thy knowledge shall the weak brother perish [future, middle, indicative of the Greek verb "apollumi"], for whom Christ died?"

This certainly appears to apply unto genuine believers.  (By the way, this also indicates that the English word "perish" is indeed used "in a post-resurrection verse" for genuine believers)

 

Edited by Pastor Scott Markle
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