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Well, to answer your questions...

What is homesteading?

I'm afraid that question is too general, because homesteading can mean different things to different people. However, I think we can give a generic definition; which is, to seek to be self-sufficient.

Why does it (homesteading) matter today?

Again, that would be answered differently by different people. However, I think we can again give a generic response; which is...

Homesteading matters today, because of various reasons depending on the one who is homesteading. For example, it may be for financial reasons, it may be for educational reasons, it may be for personal reasons (which are many and cover a wide gamut), or it may be for the simple reason that someone enjoys it. It matters today to the people who it matters to. :)

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The actual terminology means to receive a homestead grant for land, which exempts it from beinf seized or taxed-no one really owns property, because everything is bought with federal reserve notes, basically IOU's, money we borrow from the federal government, which is in turn borrowed from the federal reserve. So none of it is ours, ergo, nothing we buy is ours-our cars, land, houses, nothing. This is why it is legal to be taxed each year for it-if we truly OWNED it, they could not tax it, could not sieze it, nothing. That is the bottom line of homesteading: it is the desire to truly be free from the government having the legal right to step in a take what is yours, should they want it.

Now, if you buy property, land or a car or such, with gold or silver, which are real money, then YOU own it, lock stock and barrel and the government cannot touch it.

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4 hours ago, Ukulelemike said:

The actual terminology means to receive a homestead grant for land, which exempts it from beinf seized or taxed-no one really owns property, because everything is bought with federal reserve notes, basically IOU's, money we borrow from the federal government, which is in turn borrowed from the federal reserve. So none of it is ours, ergo, nothing we buy is ours-our cars, land, houses, nothing. This is why it is legal to be taxed each year for it-if we truly OWNED it, they could not tax it, could not sieze it, nothing. That is the bottom line of homesteading: it is the desire to truly be free from the government having the legal right to step in a take what is yours, should they want it.

Now, if you buy property, land or a car or such, with gold or silver, which are real money, then YOU own it, lock stock and barrel and the government cannot touch it.

That is interesting.

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12 hours ago, Ukulelemike said:

Now, if you buy property, land or a car or such, with gold or silver, which are real money, then YOU own it, lock stock and barrel and the government cannot touch it.

What if you purchased that gold or silver using money in the first place? If you don't own the gold (according to your definition) do you still own what you buy with it? And what if you had inherited the gold, but the person you inherited it from had purchased it with money...

I don't know much about taxes, but I think in UK the overall rule is as simple as: the state gets to tax us because we're the queen's subjects. Someone told me once that even if you own a property, i.e. have the freehold, it still ultimately belongs to the Crown. I wonder how much wealth the Queen gets every year from gobbling up the estates of those who die with no inheritors.

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On 30/06/2017 at 11:49 AM, Alimantado said:

What if you purchased that gold or silver using money in the first place? If you don't own the gold (according to your definition) do you still own what you buy with it? And what if you had inherited the gold, but the person you inherited it from had purchased it with money...

I don't know much about taxes, but I think in UK the overall rule is as simple as: the state gets to tax us because we're the queen's subjects. Someone told me once that even if you own a property, i.e. have the freehold, it still ultimately belongs to the Crown. I wonder how much wealth the Queen gets every year from gobbling up the estates of those who die with no inheritors.

It doesn't go to the queen, it goes to the govt.  The govt. are supposed to be  servants of the queen  but they only give her an allowance, called the Civil List, She says that is not enough and has to top it off from the own wealth.   The queen is not obliged to pay taxes, but that was not popular, so she now pays voluntary taxes. 

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This is one of the reasons that America has the republican form of government that it has. Our land belongs to the people, not the government. The government exists to protect the people in all things. Our government acts in an administrative capacity to execute the will of the people through their elected representatives.

In this context "homesteading" was originally instituted by our government, at the request of the people as a means of opening up the frontier of our newly formed country as it spread westward. Our administrative government made it possible for people to acquire public land and convert it to private property though a system of homesteading.

Certain lands were designated as "open to entry". This made for a system where a person could enter on the public land, physically drive stakes in the ground to define the land they were claiming. Then they were required to "prove up" on the land by building a home, tilling the soil, or creative a commercial site of some sort. Once this was accomplished for a certain number of years, the land was then removed from the status of public land and converted to private property.

Homesteading was encouraged from its early inception as people spread westward and even up until present times. When I went to Alaska in 1973 homesteading was still encouraged and acted upon by hardy individuals. So even today there exists people who originally homesteaded their land and actually went through the process that allows them the call their land their own.

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On 30/06/2017 at 11:49 AM, Alimantado said:

What if you purchased that gold or silver using money in the first place? If you don't own the gold (according to your definition) do you still own what you buy with it? And what if you had inherited the gold, but the person you inherited it from had purchased it with money...

I don't know much about taxes, but I think in UK the overall rule is as simple as: the state gets to tax us because we're the queen's subjects. Someone told me once that even if you own a property, i.e. have the freehold, it still ultimately belongs to the Crown. I wonder how much wealth the Queen gets every year from gobbling up the estates of those who die with no inheritors.

On 15/11/2017 at 3:45 PM, Invicta said:

It doesn't go to the queen, it goes to the govt.  The govt. are supposed to be  servants of the queen  but they only give her an allowance, called the Civil List, She says that is not enough and has to top it off from the own wealth.   The queen is not obliged to pay taxes, but that was not popular, so she now pays voluntary taxes. 

You do make me smile when you reply to posts 5-6 months later, Invicta. :)

Anyway, thanks for clarifying.

 

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