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    • By 1Timothy115 in Devotionals
         11
      Psalms 119:1-8                                         Sep. 5 - Oct. 2, 2019
      1 ALEPH. Blessed are the undefiled in the way, who walk in the law of the LORD.
      2 Blessed are they that keep his testimonies, and that seek him with the whole heart.
      3 They also do no iniquity: they walk in his ways.
      4 Thou hast commanded us to keep thy precepts diligently.
      5 O that my ways were directed to keep thy statutes!
      6 Then shall I not be ashamed, when I have respect unto all thy commandments.
      7 I will praise thee with uprightness of heart, when I shall have learned thy righteous judgments.
      8 I will keep thy statutes: O forsake me not utterly.
      The following verse stood out to me...
      5 O that my ways were directed to keep thy statutes!
      At first glance it seemed to me this person’s soul is poured out with intense desire to have God’s direction in keeping His Word.
      I made a small wood fire in our backyard for my granddaughter, Julia, since she would be staying overnight with us. My wife and Julia stayed outside at the fire for about half an hour. Then, I found myself alone to watch the fire die out on a particularly lovely evening. So I took my verse from above and began to repeat it for memorization. As I repeated the verse, I tried to contemplate the words and apply them to what I was seeing around me. 
      The moon and stars were out now peering through the scattered clouds above.
      [Genesis 1:16 And God made two great lights; the greater light to rule the day, and the lesser light to rule the night: he made the stars also. Genesis 1:17 And God set them in the firmament of the heaven to give light upon the earth, Genesis 1:18 And to rule over the day and over the night, and to divide the light from the darkness: and God saw that it was good.]
      Thought 1         
      The moon has stayed his course since the day God created him, also the stars, obeying the statutes directed by God from the first day they were created. Can you imagine God’s direction to the Moon and stars, “moon you will have a path through the sky above the earth, stars you will occupy the firmament above the moon and be clearly visible in the cloudless night sky.”
      Then, the trees, grass, even the air we breathe obey the statues God gave them from the beginning. None of these creations have souls, none have hearts, none have intelligence, but they all observe God’s statutes, His instructions for their limited time on earth.
      Thought 2
      What if we were like the moon, stars, trees, grass, or the other creations which have no soul? We would be directed to keep God’s statutes without choosing to keep them. This is not the image of God, there would be no dominion over other creatures, or over the earth. We would not be capable of experiencing the joy and peace of learning the love of God
      Genesis 1:26 And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.
      Philippians 4:7 And the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus.
      Thought 3 (October 2, 2019)
      Is the psalmist pleading God to force God’s statutes to become the man’s ways? No, he is speaking of his own failure in keeping God’s statutes and his desire to keep them, very much like Paul in Romans 7:14-25.
      God doesn’t work through force to turn men from their ways that they would desire His statutes or desire God Himself. Men must reject (repent) put aside his own ways and voluntarily seek God and His statutes.

Preservation and the KJV

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  • Independent Fundamental Baptist
On ‎4‎/‎30‎/‎2017 at 10:29 PM, DaveW said:

Is there ANY English version which is a perfect version of the Word of God available to us today?

This is a question which requires a simple answer - a Yes or no will do, but I would ask that if you say Yes, you provide a simple statement which nominates which version is the perfect version of the Word of God in English available to us today.

ONCE YOU HAVE done so, you may then outline the reasons all you like, but for my part I need to know this information from you.

 

Brother Tyndale,

I believe that it is very important for you to answer Brother DaveW's question above.  Most of those who have engaged with you in this thread believe that you are seeking to undercut the divine authority of the King James translation for English speaking people.  Until you provide a clear answer to Brother DaveW's question that belief will continue.

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How do you define perfect? "wilt" occurs 245 times in 208 verses in the KJV, I haven't looked in the other old translations. It has no source word in Hebrew, Chaldean, and Greek, how does adding words make English translations perfect? How is adding the word "wilt" safe according to Revelation 22:18? Remember for the older English translations all the translators are dead and the Revelation plagues have yet to appear. I'm not asking this to kick the KJV, or any of the older translations, I'm asking because I want to grow my knowledge of the word. 

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7 hours ago, MountainChristian said:

How do you define perfect? "wilt" occurs 245 times in 208 verses in the KJV, I haven't looked in the other old translations. It has no source word in Hebrew, Chaldean, and Greek, how does adding words make English translations perfect? How is adding the word "wilt" safe according to Revelation 22:18? Remember for the older English translations all the translators are dead and the Revelation plagues have yet to appear. I'm not asking this to kick the KJV, or any of the older translations, I'm asking because I want to grow my knowledge of the word. 

Brother Ken,

In English grammar the English verb changes verb tenses, voices, and moods by changing verb endings and by adding helping verbs, such as -- "am, is, are, was, were, be, being, been, have, has, had, do, does, did, should, could, would, will (wilt), shall, can, may, might, must."  However, in both Hebrew and Greek we do not find such a use of separate "helping" verbs.  Rather, in Hebrew and Greek the verb tenses, voices, and moods are developed simply through changing verb forms and endings.  As such, that which English grammar accomplishes with "helping" verbs Hebrew and Greek builds right into the change of verb forms and endings themselves.  Even so, the use of these "helping" verbs in an English translation actually DOES find its source in the Hebrew and Greek, not as individual "helping" verbs, but as that which is grammatically built into the individual Hebrew or Greek verb form and ending.  The given Hebrew or Greek verb, including its particular form and ending, IS the source word for the English verb and its helping verb.

Edited by Pastor Scott Markle
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15 minutes ago, Pastor Scott Markle said:

Brother Ken,

In English grammar the English verb changes verb tenses, voices, and moods by changing verb endings and by adding helping verbs, such as -- "am, is, are, was, were, be, being, been, have, has, had, do, does, did, should, could, would, will (wilt), shall, can, may, might, must."  However, in both Hebrew and Greek we do not find such a use of separate "helping" verbs.  Rather, in Hebrew and Greek the verb tenses, voices, and moods are developed simply through changing verb forms and endings.  As such, that which English grammar accomplishes with "helping" verbs Hebrew and Greek builds right into the change of verb forms and endings themselves.  Even so, the use of these "helping" verbs in an English translation actually DOES find their source in the Hebrew and Greek, not as individual "helping" verbs, but as that which is grammatically built into the individual Hebrew or Greek verb form and ending.  The given Hebrew or Greek verb, including its particular form and ending, IS the source word for the English verb and its helping verb.

Glad you pointed this out to clarify.

Here is an example.

the spanish word Hablar means to talk.

when you put O at the end of the word it means "I talk"

So Hablo means "I talk".

It's one Spanish word but translates exactly to two words in English. It's not that you are adding words.

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On ‎5‎/‎6‎/‎2017 at 9:53 PM, MountainChristian said:

Thank you Brothers, this gives me a great peace of mind. 

By the way, in both Hebrew and Greek pronouns can also be built right into the change in form or ending of a Hebrew or Greek word (for both verbs and nouns).

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