Jump to content
  • Welcome to Online Baptist

    Free to join.

Orval

Books that have impacted your life or ministry

Recommended Posts

Hello to all, borrowing 1611's idea of a thread for books that have impacted our lives and ministries I thought I would make the first post and invite others to join us.  The suggestion was for each to present five books but for me I thought I would post just one at a time and write a little of why it was impactful in my life.  Below is the first book.  BTW; it is not my intention to steal the post from "Mac1611" I just wanted to make sure a post got started. 

I love the thought of sharing books that have impacted one’s life and ministry for the cause of Christ.  It could not prioritize my list since I have literally read several hundred books during my ministry and like most you, my frame of mind and what I was looking for when I read these books has much to say about what I was open to receive.  None the less here are five books which impacted my life greatly. 

 

Seeing the spiritual in every day struggles can be difficult for everyone and at the time I read this book (1997) I was pastoring in small church wondering what was going on in the life of our church members and in my personal life.  In looking for answers for the intense struggle both spiritually and socially I turned to the bible and books and the title “Born for Battle 31 Lessons on Spiritual Warfare” caught my attention.  R. Arthur Matthews was one of the last two remaining “Inland China Missionaries to leave China” in 1953.  His last few years he was placed under house arrest with his wife and daughter it was during this time (like Bunyan of old” he wrote the lessons in the book. 

 

In lesson one “The Soldier of the Cross” he makes this statement which I have committed to memory. “The history of the saints in every age is one of conflict. The path the disciple treads is one of certain warfare.” There are many wonderful insights into the life of one who truly lives for Christ.  A powerful book!

 

One more quote to whet your appetite in lesson eleven Matthews talks of our prayer life being the leading edge or “Cutting Edge” of accomplishing anything in ministry.  He writes, “Considering the importance God attaches to prayer for the carrying out of his purposes on earth, we must be alert and sensitive to common habits and tendencies that impair the effectiveness and blunt the cutting edge of our praying.  Prayers that have blunt edges have no power of penetration, so not many get through to the throne.”

 

The book is 162 pages some of the lessons a mere two or three pages long but in my mind, it is a classic, written at a time when many protestants still had a passion and fire for God.

 

I will write about the four other books that impacted my ministry later this week.  Enjoy the Lord today. 

 

Here is a song from our choir from our A.M. service I hope you enjoy it.  http://cbcponca.blogspot.com/2017/02/choir-special-there-is-power-in-name-of.html

 

Edited by Orval

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Orval said:

Seeing the spiritual in every day struggles can be difficult for everyone and at the time I read this book (1997) I was pastoring in small church wondering what was going on in the life of our church members and in my personal life.  In looking for answers for the intense struggle both spiritually and socially I turned to the bible and books and the title “Born for Battle 31 Lessons on Spiritual Warfare” caught my attention.  R. Arthur Matthews was one of the last two remaining “Inland China Missionaries to leave China” in 1953.  His last few years he was placed under house arrest with his wife and daughter it was during this time (like Bunyan of old” he wrote the lessons in the book. 

I was not previously aware of this book or author.  However, upon your recommendation I have looked it up on Amazon, and have placed it on my book with list.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Pastor Scott Markle said:

I was not previously aware of this book or author.  However, upon your recommendation I have looked it up on Amazon, and have placed it on my book with list.

Pastor Markel,

 

This book is not of the same context as books written in the last twenty-five years.  I have read Anderson and Logan and a couple of others whom I cannot remember, there is no hyper excitement about doing battle with Satan the book is much more down to earth and reminds the reader that we are in an age-old battle, and the battle is not unique to our age, yet we have the same mandate that believers in all ages have had.  Put on our armor, pick up our Sword and prepare for war with the enemy. 

 

I have been asked a few times in the past 40 years this question, “if you were stranded on an Island and you could only have your bible and 1-5 books what would they be” without doubt Born for Battle and Pilgrim’s Progress would be on my list?

 

Please let us know what your thoughts are on the content of the book.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, 1611mac said:

- The Genesis Flood by Morris and Whitcomb  - One of the first books I read as a new Christian (outside of Bible study books) and it convinced me from day one that I could believe a literal Genesis/O.T.  account.
 

Brother 1611mac,

 

I have read portions of the Genesis Flood, but not the whole book.  I have been to the Institute of Creation Research which I believe (I could be wrong ) was in part sponsored by Scott Memorial Baptist in El Cajon California in its early years.  Though I have never met Morris or Whitcomb their collaboration on the book and its impact on the Young Earth movement is greatly appreciated.  Happy to see it on the list.

 

   

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is my presentation of book number two concerning five books that have impacted my ministry, and my testimony of how God used the book in my life.

 

I got saved in 1976, I was a 26-year-old man who had spent the last two years looking for answers to life.  My wife and I had four children, but our marriage was far from strong or even good immediately upon salvation our pastor spent like to months preaching and teaching on family relationships and as my wife and I changed toward God we changed toward one another as well. 

 

By, 1978 I felt the Lord dealing with me about ministry, I was teaching the 3rd and 4th grade children but knew God was moving me in a different direction.  I approached my pastor about my feelings and he gave me a book that would challenge me to the core of my being.  The title, “The Perfect Will of God” by G. Christian Weiss, my pastor said to me “read this book and come back and talk to me about it”.  I devoured the book, finished it in a couple of days, but the truths of God’s word and the requirements of the servant of God as pointed out by Mr. Weiss crushed my thoughts of entering the ministry.  I thought to myself there is no way I can meet all those requirements the bible talks about. 

 

So, I did not go back to pastor, instead I just taught my class for the next several months, but the call lay there in my mind nearly every day.  Then a man came to our church (who I will not name) and preached a famous message of his simply titled “Duty” I have the date marked in my very first bible April 23, 1978. Beside it I have the words don’t quit.  I reread The Perfect Will of God, and an illustration Mr. Weiss used has never left my mind. This is a paraphrase; “a farmer was walking through his apple orchard one fall day and as he came to each the apples would get excited, oh boy said one I shall be picked and be made into an apple pie, another stated oh here he comes perhaps today I will be made into apple butter and my taste shall cheer up the children, and so on as the farmer walked in his orchard all the apples wanted so much to be picked and put to great purpose by the farmer.  But the apples did not know what the farmer was thinking as he walked through his orchard and looked at each apple.  The Farmer was saying to himself hurry up and ripen so I can use you for the purpose you were created”. 

 

I came away from my second reading with these thoughts, if God is choosing me for ministry it must mean that I am ready for my next step and that God has purpose for choosing me.  The first time I read the book it scared me the second time it assured me.

 

A marvelous book that I shall be forever thankful for its impact on moving me from point A to point B in my journey to serve God.

 

Kindle has the book for 1.99 and you will not be sorry you read it.

 

 

 

 

          

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like you, it's hard to pin down just 5 out of the plethora on the shelf, but these are what came to mind when I thought about memorable/impactful reads...

Forever Settled by Jack Moorman -- Really framed the KJV issue logically thoughtful way. While faith is my lens, I'm a facts and details guy so if you want to change my position on something, you have to give me a sound argument based on those facts/details. This book offers amazing detail on theological implications as well as the textual evidence that sent me down a rabbit hole of studies that galvanized my conviction on the KJV.

Radical: Taking Back Your Faith from the American Dream by David Platt -- This was a great book about reorienting how success in ministry is judged (primarily from the perspective of the ministry worker). It talks about how our ideas on successful have been clouded by the idea of the American Dream wherein success is indicated by the increasingly unattainable descriptors of "more x", "bigger y", "benchmark z." Radical is essentially about dropping those notions and getting back to the idea of radical abandonment of self and personal goals in favor of pursuing God's goals and mission. It's about winning souls and training disciples; that's it.

Grasping God's Word by J. Scott Duvall -- This was one of my hermeneutics textbooks in seminary. It's one of those I can't endorse wholesale mostly do to sections on Bible texts and translations, but they were largely unimportant to the overall purpose of the book, which was principles of interpretation and being consistent. While it wasn't overly inspirational or paradigm-forming, it laid a solid foundation for consistent biblical interpretation.

Tactics: A Game Plan for Discussing Christian Convictions by Gregory Koukl -- I actually just finished this book, so I guess the impact is still TBD; but it was just that good. The premise is just like the title sounds. It is one of the best resources I've seen for defensive apologetics (i.e., when you come across a challenge to your faith in everyday life situations) and is suitable for Christians of all levels from newly saved to the well-studied.

Refuting Compromise by Jonathan Sarfati -- When I finally began to really take my faith seriously, I was undergoing an investigation into the whole creation vs. evolution argument. Truly, it was the topic that reignited me and sent me into earnest ministry. Like I said above, I'm a facts and details guy. I believed the Bible account was true, but I didn't know how to reconcile it with what I had been taught as "fact" my whole life. After a lot of investigation and reading, I came across this book by a PhD Chemist who was equally well-versed in the Bible and it all really sank in. If you are scientifically-minded, this book and the other two written by this author (Refuting Evolution and Refuting Evolution 2) are excellent resources on the topic.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  

Brother Sword,

 

Thanks for posting the list, I substitute teach practical apologetics at heartland when our pastor is out of the classroom.  Book four Tactics: A Game Plan for Discussing Christian Convictions would be something I might enjoy.  I have not heard of Gregory Koukl but I did order the book and will let you know what I think of it in the next month or so.  Thanks for contributing to the discussion.   

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I mentioned earlier, "The Lotus and the Cross" by Ravi Zachariah is at the top of my list. The Lord brought it to me when I was coming to a very bad place in my life and ministry, I had been "beset on every side" by fellow brethren for so long as I tried to serve and do right, and I was getting so weary of the fight that I was getting mean. I badly needed this little book to remind me how to speak the truth honestly while remaining gentle and gracious to the broken sinner. No book has ever affected me and brought about a change in me like that one.

"A Tale of Three Kings", again a book about brokenness and humility in the face of adversity in the church. Read it multiple times.

"Dispensationalism Truth" by Clarence Larkin, I always just eat the meat and spit out the bones.

"Two Babylons" by Alexander Hislop. Some have problems with it, but Im a history nut, and I get it. And it burnt out of me so much of today's empty, modern church traditions.

"Mountain Rain" by Eileen Crossman. A biography of missionary James Fraser. Strongly impressed upon me practicle simplicity and sacrifice in the Lord's service.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To all contributors,

I am greatly enjoying this thread.  I AM a reader, and the various book "reports" are providing many suggestions for purchase and reading.

As far as my own contribution, I really do NOT have a top five most impacting books for my life (other than God's Holy Word, obviously).  For me, I would be more likely to present most preferred authors, or to present the top three book preferences within various categories (such as, the subject of humility, the subject of Biblical counseling, the subject of the Holy Spirit, the subject of the Spirit-filled life, Christian biography, Baptist history, etc.).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everyone is free to post as they wish... Top 3 in categories would also make great posts.

9 hours ago, weary warrior said:

"Dispensationalism Truth" by Clarence Larkin, I always just eat the meat and spit out the bones.

Yes... I've always been intrigued by Larkin.  As a young Christian I sat and spent hours studying his charts and drawings. But you do have to watch for bones..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, 1611mac said:

On the KJV issue it was Edward Hills, Burgon, and Miller for me. 

1611,

I have never gotten deep into the KJV issue, I use and will always use the KJV, but my interest in the debate is only surface at best.  I have read God’s Secretaries by Adam Nicholson which takes in the political climate and the men who wrote translated the KJV.  I have read R.B. Quellette “A More Sure Word” and Final Authority by William Grady. 

I am thankful for the men and women who, like yourself see the complete landscape and the issues of the battle before us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, weary warrior said:

As I mentioned earlier, "The Lotus and the Cross" by Ravi Zachariah is at the top of my list. The Lord brought it to me when I was coming to a very bad place in my life and ministry, I had been "beset on every side" by fellow brethren for so long as I tried to serve and do right, and I was getting so weary of the fight that I was getting mean. I badly needed this little book to remind me how to speak the truth honestly while remaining gentle and gracious to the broken sinner. No book has ever affected me and brought about a change in me like that one.

"A Tale of Three Kings", again a book about brokenness and humility in the face of adversity in the church. Read it multiple times.

"Dispensationalism Truth" by Clarence Larkin, I always just eat the meat and spit out the bones.

"Two Babylons" by Alexander Hislop. Some have problems with it, but Im a history nut, and I get it. And it burnt out of me so much of today's empty, modern church traditions.

"Mountain Rain" by Eileen Crossman. A biography of missionary James Fraser. Strongly impressed upon me practicle simplicity and sacrifice in the Lord's service.

Wearywarrior,

 

I am a fan of Ravi and have a few of his books in my library but not the “Lotus and the Cross” I will keep my eye out for it.  I just finished “Why Jesus” which offers some great insights into Eastern Mysticism and my wife and I both enjoyed greatly “The Master Weaver”

 

The Three Kings I read many years ago, as well as Hyslop and Larken.  I have not read Mountain Rain but suspect that when I tell my wife about it she will order it. Ha

 

Thanks for contributing I am surely enjoying this thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am very familiar with Mr. Clouds ministry, and I truly cherish my Baptist History Collection CD.  I would say to the other readers on the board the Baptist History Collection is a must for serious students of our heritage.  Thousands of dollars’ worth of books are at your fingertips for $50.00 (unless the price has increased), well worth the price.

 

I appreciate all the hard work your team does.  Thanks for the links.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Book number three and why it impacted my life.  Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan.  Finished in 1677 and published in 1678 other than the bible this book has been read more than any other book in the last 350 years.  In the early years of America and through the 2nd world war the two books you found in nearly every household in America was the King James Bible and Pilgrim’s Progress.  The books historical presence and eternal impact will never be known this side of eternity but its impact in my personal life will forever be appreciated.  The book is an allegory of everyone’s journey from conviction to entrance into heaven, in my opinion a must read. 

 

Upon opening the book we come upon Pilgrim running from the City of Destruction to the Celestial City and he is burdened because of the book in his hand (the bible) not sure how to escape the revelations shown him in the book.  Until he comes to the wicket gate, which was shown to him by Evangelist, the wicket gate symbolic of many things, first and foremost opening the gate was the same as determining to search and investigate the cross of Christ beyond the entrance. I have used this illustration many times when speaking with people over the years explaining that just because one can see the cross does not mean you have kneeled at the cross, it does not mean you have committed yourself to approaching the cross, nor confessing your sins.  The wicket gate has served as a reminder through the years that I responded to the Christ who died on that cross for my sins, I made a rational decision to come to the cross, I opened the gate as it were, and entered for the express purpose of coming to the cross and to Christ.

 

Christian meets many people in his journey, Mr. Legality, Mr. Worldly Wiseman, Mr. Goodwill, Mr. Mistrust and Mr. Timouros each being part of the journey to the Celestial City.

 

The second reason impact on my life is yet future the description of Christian is one of the grandest expressions of faith found anywhere except by the precious martyrs.  The River of Death and Pilgrims entrance and determination to cross it while beholding the Celestial City is moving.  I picture my death similarly that I will know I am dying and yet have my vision so focused on where I am going I enter death with a great peace and longing for my arrival in the Celestial City. 

 

I would encourage everyone to read this book and if you have Children read it to them a few pages at a time and then discuss what you have read.  It will be a marvelous opportunity to pass God’s wisdom to your children while they are yet young.  And Christian can be one of their heroes.

 

This is a must read and has been translated into over 200 different languages.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The forth book that has impacted my life is a more recent purchase and comes in the twilight of my life as it were.  Dr. Paul Chappell’s book “When a Nation Turns its Back on God” should be required reading for every servant in every church in America.  I suppose the principles that are presented would be appropriate for any nation (Romans 1). 

I am a patriot and an American, I pray often for our nation and our leadership both federal and local.  But when I read this book I found myself in tears often and on my knees often.  The point is driven home that we must have a plan to reach our nation with the gospel of Christ it will not happen by osmosis but by intention. 

Dr. Chappell encourages the reader to realize that our nation is further from God than the world of Christ and the apostles, and that the power of the word of God gives us cause for hope and not despair.  Where sin abounds grace doth much more abound.  It is hard to express the impact of this book on my life.  As an older believer, I had nearly come to the point where I was just going to ride out my remaining days and do some writing and blogging but this book encouraged me not to give up on the fight but instead involve myself with a plan to witness.  It was the challenge issued in this book that has caused me to plan on how I can make a difference in the small area of the planet I live. 

Let me encourage you to purchase and read this book it will be worth your while.  It is a mini paperback, 144 pages long and sells for $3.95 from striving together publications.  Kindle is $2.99 and if you have Amazon Prime it is $3.95

 

A great read!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An early book that would greatly affect my future (at the time) ministry, and my overall appreciation for the word of God, was "Foxe's Book of Martyrs." I haven't read his entire series on it, but the single book. It is a tough read, and heartbreaking, but so important for a believer to truly appreciate what has gone before and made the life we have today, and the freedoms we have now, available. I once talked to a preacher, on the subject of whether believers would be present for the Great Tribulation (don't want to bring that up here!) who said he could never worship a God who would allow one of his children to have to stand helplessly and watch his wife and children be put to death, and I just thought, Wow, does this guy have no sense of history whatsoever? What believers have gone through for the cause of Christ in the past, and still do in some instances today, would make most believers' knees buckle and fail.

Another short, simple but very good book is "Touch Not the Unclean Thing" by David Sorenson, a book on the Bible version issue. It isn't an indepth book, but gives a relatively brief, all-around explanation of the issue. My favorite part is the section on the various language translations that have come from the Textus Receptus, from Asian, European, even Native American languages. Amazing stuff.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My fifth and final book that has impacted my ministry is Well-Intentioned Dragons by Marshall Shelley.   Several years ago I became pastor of a small Baptist church in a small city we enjoyed moderate growth and after a couple years I began to notice that there were some underlying stresses in the congregation and in seeking to find the problem I seemed to make several mistakes and soon found myself at odds with some of our members. 

 

I sought some advice from a few pastoral friends one of which suggested this book.  What an encouragement the book turned out to be. Mr. Shelley writes in satirical style similar to C.S.; Lewis’s The Screw Tape Letters (suggested reading) of a young pastor coming to an older pastor for help with people problems in his pastorate.  The wise and kind older pastor gives the young pastor various counsels of how handle each case.  On page 34 Shelly speaks clearly to the purpose of the book. 

 

"The rest of this book deals with various kinds of dragons, their tactics, and the ways to handle them. But from the beginning a premise stands clear: the goal in handling dragons is not to destroy them, not merely to disassociate, but to make them disciples. Even when that seems an unlikely prospect" (p. 34). 

 

People problems are part of ministry and Proverbs reminds us that we need workers in ministry but with those workers come messes and we cannot have one without the other.  No messes to clean up means we have no workers so be thankful for the messes.

 

Proverbs 14:4 Where no oxen are, the crib is clean: but much increase is by the strength of the ox.

 

This book should be a must read for every young pastor and we older ones as well.  People are our business and generally the messes they make are well-intentioned.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Orval said:

My fifth and final book that has impacted my ministry is Well-Intentioned Dragons by Marshall Shelley.   Several years ago I became pastor of a small Baptist church in a small city we enjoyed moderate growth and after a couple years I began to notice that there were some underlying stresses in the congregation and in seeking to find the problem I seemed to make several mistakes and soon found myself at odds with some of our members. 

 

I sought some advice from a few pastoral friends one of which suggested this book.  What an encouragement the book turned out to be. Mr. Shelley writes in satirical style similar to C.S.; Lewis’s The Screw Tape Letters (suggested reading) of a young pastor coming to an older pastor for help with people problems in his pastorate.  The wise and kind older pastor gives the young pastor various counsels of how handle each case.  On page 34 Shelly speaks clearly to the purpose of the book. 

 

"The rest of this book deals with various kinds of dragons, their tactics, and the ways to handle them. But from the beginning a premise stands clear: the goal in handling dragons is not to destroy them, not merely to disassociate, but to make them disciples. Even when that seems an unlikely prospect" (p. 34). 

 

People problems are part of ministry and Proverbs reminds us that we need workers in ministry but with those workers come messes and we cannot have one without the other.  No messes to clean up means we have no workers so be thankful for the messes.

 

Proverbs 14:4 Where no oxen are, the crib is clean: but much increase is by the strength of the ox.

 

This book should be a must read for every young pastor and we older ones as well.  People are our business and generally the messes they make are well-intentioned.

 

I amy look for this book. I have found in my ministry that people have a tendency of just leaving-often no explanation, they are involved, active, sometimes in a ministry, then suddenly, just gone. Not a word, nothing. A few leave after many years, some cite things like "Well, we think you're wrong in such-and-such area", and when I offer to sit with our Bibles and go over it, it is, "nope, we're leaving." One man left saying "Oh, there's no joy in the church", which is odd, since most don't seem to find that an issue. Of course, later on I found out that he suspected I was mis-handling the church money, and I found out when he had dropped the suggestion in the ears of one of our young men, much after he left the church, who came and asked me what we did with the church money. I honestly had to reply: "What money?" Because no one gives at our church. That man did, maybe $100 each payday, for a few months, then he stopped. Otherwise, all the money comes from myself, my MOTHER who doesn't attend the church since she lives away from us, and a former member who believes the Lord put our church in his heart to help financially, even though he lives across the country. After we lost our old building, due to the lack of giving, I think he thought there was all kinds of money coming in and we were misuing it, instead of paying the bills. It stung a bit, but my wife REALLY got mad, and started telling them about how most churhes pay their pastor, while their pastor pays to be the pastor, and kind of shamed them all a bit. Not enough that they have begun to give, though. Seemed every time I taught on biblical New Testament giving, the offerings shrank.    

So maybe I need to learn about dragons.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Ukulelemike said:

I amy look for this book. I have found in my ministry that people have a tendency of just leaving-often no explanation, they are involved, active, sometimes in a ministry, then suddenly, just gone. Not a word, nothing. A few leave after many years, some cite things like "Well, we think you're wrong in such-and-such area", and when I offer to sit with our Bibles and go over it, it is, "nope, we're leaving." One man left saying "Oh, there's no joy in the church", which is odd, since most don't seem to find that an issue. Of course, later on I found out that he suspected I was mis-handling the church money, and I found out when he had dropped the suggestion in the ears of one of our young men, much after he left the church, who came and asked me what we did with the church money. I honestly had to reply: "What money?" Because no one gives at our church. That man did, maybe $100 each payday, for a few months, then he stopped. Otherwise, all the money comes from myself, my MOTHER who doesn't attend the church since she lives away from us, and a former member who believes the Lord put our church in his heart to help financially, even though he lives across the country. After we lost our old building, due to the lack of giving, I think he thought there was all kinds of money coming in and we were misuing it, instead of paying the bills. It stung a bit, but my wife REALLY got mad, and started telling them about how most churhes pay their pastor, while their pastor pays to be the pastor, and kind of shamed them all a bit. Not enough that they have begun to give, though. Seemed every time I taught on biblical New Testament giving, the offerings shrank.    

So maybe I need to learn about dragons.

 

Brother Mike,

 

My heart was truly broken to hear your story and it is obvious that your wife loves and wants to protect you from being hurt or having to submit to such unfair judgments. 

 

If you would not mind I would like to offer you a couple of suggestions for your ministry.

 

1.    If your people do not give then they must be taught to give.  This is a biblical principle, when I took over the small church several years ago, they asked me to come for $50 per week I told them no, that they would have to pay me $100 per week.  At the time, I knew they would be able to afford it because I knew what my offerings would be to the church.  The main thing I wanted them to see was that they had a responsibility to provide for the pastor.

 

After approximately two years I began to do a stewardship month each January where we highlighted, missions, giving of time, giving of our-selves and giving financially.  We set financial goals and began to teach giving in all areas.   The church was in debt when I got there and had no church insurance or savings.  We paid off our loan in my fifth year, established a budget that would allow us to financially free and afford insurance.  Near the end of my fifth year I taught a series of messages on the churches responsibility to provide for the pastor.  At that time the church voted to support my family at $1300 per month which was a real stretch of faith for them but one I was excited to see them take.

 

The process is long my brother but you need to be paid something to begin with and your people need to be taught over time that it is there responsibility to take care of their pastor as best they can.  There is a wonderful story in 1Kings 17 concerning Elijah and the widow woman who had just enough for her and her son to eat and then die.  In verse 13 Elijah told this poor woman who had nothing to make him a small cake first then make for herself and her son.

 

The message is simple you may not have much to give but if you will give what you can God will use it to provide first for the man of God and secondly to the giver.  Give and it shall be given unto you still works.

 

2.    Let your people know you have needs.  The decisions human beings make are made in conjunction with both their reasoning capabilities and their emotions.  You need to learn to humbly let your needs be known to your congregation.  We had corporate prayer on Wednesday night, we broke into small groups of two or three and we prayed to God out loud in those groups.  Before we broke into prayer groups I would ask for prayer requests and for needs to be presented. We gave people pieces of paper to write the requests on and those request sheets were the basis for many of the prayers.  It was in those times I was able to ask for prayer in particular areas my family had needs in.  You would be amazed how many times we got an encouraging comment or note saying someone was praying for our need and on more than one occasion we found money attached to our door or laying on my desk at church. 

 

Your people need to know you have a need before they can respond to that need.  Remember decisions are part logic and part emotion let them see your need.

 

It sounds like this book would be a great help to you.  If you will PM me your name and address I would be happy to purchase the book and have it sent your way.

 

God bless you and your family as you minister together.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started off being paid, but as the church shrunk in numbers, I took outside employment. At the time, also, my wife worked as a nurse, so we opted to drop the pay. Unfortunately, my wife's health took a downward turn and she isn't working, and honestly I don't want her to.

We have a small farm with some animals, goats and such, so that takes up some money.

I think when they did the questioning of how we spent the church money, and my wife kind of let them have it over that, we really laid out where we were. For instance, we have two families, a couple and a single woman in her 40's, that are on complete disability, (though really none of them need to be and we are working on that), and they have no vehicles. We live roughly 40-60 miles from shopping areas, in the boonies, (I don't know why poor people with no cares want to live here!), so we often have taken them shopping, to doctor's appointments and the like, and in a Suburban, which is what I drive, it takes a lot in gas, which they just never thought about. Well, they know now, lol. But on the plus side, a couple young men in the church, twins, have started helping out with this, as well.

Another thing you should know-we only run about 8-10 people right now. We were closer to 20 last year this time, but last year I dedicated to getting everyone on one page. Being in a very small area, there aren't many churches, so we had Baptists, methodists, S.Baptists, some AOG, all with their various particular beliefs. Well, the Bible is clear we need to be in one accord, especially in doctrine, so that became the vision for the year. We are left with 8 now, the rest left, not willing to part with various issues. So we are sort of in a restart place right now, but with few to draw from in the area. 

You know, I never figured you could have so many issues with so few-but really, a lot is my own fault. Teaching them to give and the blessings that come with it can be hard, and it always seems kind of self-serving, you know? So I have done a poor job of it. This has opened my eyes to seeing the need to teach even this sort of thing, because it is one area of blessing they lose if they don't give.

As for the book, thank you much, but I do work so i can afford it. very inexpensive on Amazon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me mention another book that impacted my life as a very young Christian.  Harry Ironside's "Holiness, the False and the True."  I love Harry Ironside's writing.  The first half of this book is biographical and tells how he came out of the the "holiness" movement (Salvation Army).  It is quite inspirational.  The second half of the book is doctrinal.  Free to read on several sites.  Here is place where you read it online.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎2‎/‎27‎/‎2017 at 1:25 PM, TheSword said:

Tactics: A Game Plan for Discussing Christian Convictions by Gregory Koukl -- I actually just finished this book, so I guess the impact is still TBD; but it was just that good. The premise is just like the title sounds. It is one of the best resources I've seen for defensive apologetics (i.e., when you come across a challenge to your faith in everyday life situations) and is suitable for Christians of all levels from newly saved to the well-studied.

Brother Sword,

I finished the book Tactics and thought I would give my opinion on the read.  Overall I was quite pleased with the book.  Mr. Koukl did a great job of accomplishing his purpose which was specifically stated as providing ambassadors for Christ with a means of turning a potentially explosive confrontation into a civil discussion.  Providing a series of tactical questions which allows one to defend their faith without being drawn into an argument or angering someone with an unappreciated rebuttal.  I would definitely recommend it all who want to develop a plan for engaging people with strongly held beliefs that are contrary to their own. 

I loved the Columbo designation for set up questions, as well as the series on types of suicide or self defeating statements (must read the book to appreciate these words).

The cons are not many but for me they were important.  

Mr. Koukl presents his work as a help to believers and yet seldom refers to the scriptures, it is primarily an intellectual approach to defending those things we believe to be truth.  I am not against the book but I believe that a book admonishing being ambassadors for Christ should probably have a bit more bible in its pages.

Secondly, I caught on very quickly that Mr. Koukl is a strong Calvinist as early in the book he speaks of the sovereignty of grace (predestination) and uses other words that give him away as well.  A quick search on the internet verified my suspicions.  While I have recommended the book to several pastor friends it is unlikely our pastor will use it at Heartland BBC because our stand against Reformed Theology would not be consistent. 

Over all I give the book a strong B+ and I am glad you put it on your list.        

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Who's Online   0 Members, 0 Anonymous, 34 Guests (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

Article Categories

About Us

Since 2001, Online Baptist has been an Independent Baptist website, and we exclusively use the King James Version of the Bible. We pride ourselves on a community that uplifts the Lord.

Contact Us

You can contact us using the following link. Contact Us or for questions regarding this website please contact @pastormatt or email James Foley at jfoley@sisqtel.net

Android App

Online Baptist has a custom App for all android users. You can download it from the Google Play store or click the following icon.

×
×
  • Create New...