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No Nicolaitans

Wowzers! Heat/air Services Make A Killing!

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If you work in the heat/air business...please tell me if I'm wrong about this.  If I'm correct...how about cutting us a little slack! :nuts: 

 

 

We were quoted two prices by two Heat/Air services for installing a new thermostat.

(The quotes included the thermostat and labor)

Quote #1 - $150.00
Quote #2 - $125.00

I looked at thermostats at Lowe's online. Prices varied from about $20 to over $300. We bought one at Lowe's for $60. It was a little higher than I really wanted to pay, but it's a touchscreen and looks nicer than the less expensive ones. 

Anyway, it took me about 30 minutes to install...should have taken less time, but this was the first time I've ever installed a thermostat. I highly doubt that the thermostat that either Heat/Air service would have installed would have been as nice as the one we bought...but if it was, after breaking the pricing down...knowing it would have taken them less time to install it...that means they would have been charging us at a minimum $130 - $180 an hour for the labor!

Quote #1 - $150 - $60 (the cost of the thermostat) = $90 for 30 minutes work.
$90 x 2 = $180/hr.

Quote #2 - $125 - $60 (the cost of the thermostat) = $65 for 30 minutes work.
$65 x 2 = $130/hr.

 

:jaw:

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Did you allow for markup and trip charge? 

 My own hourly rate for design work, shop work, and installations is $60/hr which is really low even for my line of work. I'm sure HVAC rates are higher for sure.. If an installation were only 30 minutes but the travel was 15 minutes away, I would need to charge a full hour $60 (30 + 15+ 15) plus the fuel cost.

 

It;s good you could install yourself. That's what I would do.

Edited by heartstrings

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Did you allow for markup and trip charge? 

 My own hourly rate for design work, shop work, and installations is $60/hr which is really low even for my line of work. I'm sure HVAC rates are higher for sure.. If an installation were only 30 minutes but the travel was 15 minutes away, I would need to charge a full hour $60 (30 + 15+ 15) plus the fuel cost.

 

It;s good you could install yourself. That's what I would do.

 

Well, what's kind of funny is...the guy with the higher quote is less than 2 miles from our house.  The guy with the lower quote does our repairs where I work...he would have about a 45 minute drive to our house.

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Several things:

they are charging $90/hr or any portion thereof

if you have any office staff -- receptionist, parts runner, estimator -- they get paid even if you don't have business the whole 40 hours that week

if you have a building and utilities they are on commercial rates and property tax levels

it use to cost me $30,000/ year for fuel for my vans and I had one getting the oil changed every week

 

For me to make $17,000 as personal income I had to do $150,000 business (that was in 2007)

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Seems you expect the man to work for nothing & lose money on every job he does.

 

And to think many pastors complain about being underpaid, yet they want the heating & air man to lose money on every job.

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Seems you expect the man to work for nothing & lose money on every job he does.

 

And to think many pastors complain about being underpaid, yet they want the heating & air man to lose money on every job.

I don't know if that really reflects his attitude towards it, many people just have NO idea how much it costs to employ people and run a business -- they see most of it as being available income.

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I don't know if that really reflects his attitude towards it, many people just have NO idea how much it costs to employ people and run a business -- they see most of it as being available income.

 

That's true, yet there's many that wants people to work for nothing & never consider what it cost the repairman to come to their place to do a repair. And its true some of them will charge a bit to much.

 

Because of cost & never having much money that's the reason though the years I did most of my own mechanic work, & home repairs, only calling a profession when it was beyond what I can do.

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Wowzers! Heat/air Services Make A Killing!

 

We're that true, everyone would be in the HVAC business.

There are a lot of folks who try to get into that line of work because of the good pay.

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Seems you expect the man to work for nothing & lose money on every job he does.

 

And to think many pastors complain about being underpaid, yet they want the heating & air man to lose money on every job.

 

 

Bro. Jerry, did you see the first sentence of my opening post? I said...

 

 

If you work in the heat/air business...please tell me if I'm wrong about this.  If I'm correct...how about cutting us a little slack! :nuts: 

 

 

 

Did you allow for markup and trip charge? 

 My own hourly rate for design work, shop work, and installations is $60/hr which is really low even for my line of work. I'm sure HVAC rates are higher for sure.. If an installation were only 30 minutes but the travel was 15 minutes away, I would need to charge a full hour $60 (30 + 15+ 15) plus the fuel cost.

 

It;s good you could install yourself. That's what I would do.

 

 

Thanks heartstrings.

 

 

Several things:

they are charging $90/hr or any portion thereof

if you have any office staff -- receptionist, parts runner, estimator -- they get paid even if you don't have business the whole 40 hours that week

if you have a building and utilities they are on commercial rates and property tax levels

it use to cost me $30,000/ year for fuel for my vans and I had one getting the oil changed every week

 

For me to make $17,000 as personal income I had to do $150,000 business (that was in 2007)

 

 

Thanks OFP...wowzers, see...it's things like that which I never thought of.

 

 

Wowzers! Heat/air Services Make A Killing!

 

We're that true, everyone would be in the HVAC business.

 

:nuts:

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Several things:

they are charging $90/hr or any portion thereof

if you have any office staff -- receptionist, parts runner, estimator -- they get paid even if you don't have business the whole 40 hours that week

if you have a building and utilities they are on commercial rates and property tax levels

it use to cost me $30,000/ year for fuel for my vans and I had one getting the oil changed every week

 

For me to make $17,000 as personal income I had to do $150,000 business (that was in 2007)

Wow! And I thought I had it bad. I've usually been able to to keep my cost of goods and overhead down to a little less than 66%, so I only need gross sales of about $50,000 or so to clear that much income. A big part of that is because I own my buildings and don't have to pay rent. But it still shows that none of us get to keep all the money

Edited by heartstrings

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If you work in the heat/air business...please tell me if I'm wrong about this. If I'm correct...how about cutting us a little slack! :nuts:


We were quoted two prices by two Heat/Air services for installing a new thermostat.
(The quotes included the thermostat and labor)

Quote #1 - $150.00
Quote #2 - $125.00

I looked at thermostats at Lowe's online. Prices varied from about $20 to over $300. We bought one at Lowe's for $60. It was a little higher than I really wanted to pay, but it's a touchscreen and looks nicer than the less expensive ones.

Anyway, it took me about 30 minutes to install...should have taken less time, but this was the first time I've ever installed a thermostat. I highly doubt that the thermostat that either Heat/Air service would have installed would have been as nice as the one we bought...but if it was, after breaking the pricing down...knowing it would have taken them less time to install it...that means they would have been charging us at a minimum $130 - $180 an hour for the labor!

Quote #1 - $150 - $60 (the cost of the thermostat) = $90 for 30 minutes work.
$90 x 2 = $180/hr.

Quote #2 - $125 - $60 (the cost of the thermostat) = $65 for 30 minutes work.
$65 x 2 = $130/hr.


:jaw:


Trip charge, thermostat, and labour? $150 is fair. You got to know what you're doing. If you have a heat-pump a/c? You can fried the thransformer . Straight cool are easyer to install, programming thermostats can take time too, if you buy one of these.

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Well, after our latest fiasco...Heat/Air contractors aren't that expensive after all!

 

To make a long story short...

 

The water line for our refrigerator had been leaking for an unknown amount of time...just a fine mist.  We've been homeowners now for 10 years, and this is the first time we've ever dealt with anything like this.

 

This past summer, we had our air ducts replaced because of black mold growing in them...so, our first reaction to this water leak was, "Oh no, another mold problem!"  This weekend, I spent 12 hours pulling up engineered hardwood flooring that I had laid down about 5 years ago. The water had really spread out over a big area.  After getting the flooring up, only about 5 square feet of sub floor was a little wet.  

 

Remember, we've never experienced anything like this before...we didn't know to call the insurance company right away. We called them on Monday...they weren't happy that I removed the flooring, but they sent a contractor out to look at it (not an insurance person).  He sent another guy today to take care of business.

 

The guy today did the following...

 

1.  For about an hour, he scraped up linoleum from part of the floor of the affected area (I laid the hardwood over the linoleum in the kitchen and dining room).

2.  He set up a large dehumidifier in the affected area inside of the house.

3.  He set up a large dehumidifier in the crawl space under the affected area.

4.  He removed a few pieces of toe kicks from underneath the cabinets and set up a large fan to dry the area out under the cabinets.

 

Total time: +/- 2 hours.

 

I asked the boss who originally came on Monday what the cost for this would be if the insurance didn't cover it for some unknown reason.

 

He said, "It'll be around $1,200."

 

:jaw:

 

Those measly quotes we were given for replacing a thermostat weren't so bad after all!  :nuts:

 

If anyone wants to know...yes, you can put a wooden spoon in those large fans, and it'll bust the spoon up nicely without hurting the fan...at least our 3 year old son can.   :hide:

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$1200 in two hours? Wowsers!!

 

 I own two dehumidifiers and what they do is condense the moisture from the AIR distributed throughout the whole room; not a targeted space.  An air conditioner works by the exact same process and does the same thing. How many gallons of water did they remove from the dehumidifiers' reservoirs? I don't know how large his units are but mine can continue to pull several gallons from an average room but it takes a lot longer than two hours with both of them running to do it. I know because I've done that when laying gold leaf on fancy doctor's office signs but even doing something as technical as that I never charged even a fourth that much for two hours. Yikes!

Edited by heartstrings

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Wowsers!!

 

 I own two dehumidifiers and what they do is condense the moisture from the AIR distributed throughout the whole room; not a targeted space.  An air conditioner works by the exact same process and does the same thing. How many gallons of water did they remove from the dehumidifiers' reservoirs? I don't know how large his units are but mine can continue to pull several gallons from an average room but it takes a lot longer than two hours with both of them running to do it. I know because I've done that when laying gold leaf on fancy doctor's office signs but even doing something as technical as that I never charged even half that much for two hours. Yikes!

 

 

Oh no...I gave the wrong impression.  The dehumidifiers and fan were left at our house to continue running for 3 days...not just the two hours he was there.  I have no way of knowing how many gallons they will pull...they have a pump in order to drain continuously.  The one inside is draining into our kitchen sink, but there's really not that much flow.  After I pulled the wood floors up, we cleaned up what we could...they're just helping pull the water from the sub floor.

 

We also have our own dehumidifier.  I have it set up to drain continuously too, but it's rated at 12 gallons/day. The people who replaced our duct work last summer told us we needed one for under the house during the summer.  I immediately brought it up when the refrigerator leak was discovered.

 

The dehumidifiers they brought are about 3 feet wide x 3 feet long x 4 feet high...and VERY loud.

Edited by No Nicolaitans

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Yeah...the company who replaced our duct work (they did a lot more than just replacing the duct work) were at our house for about 10 hours.  They did everything in one day, and the total charge was $1600.

 

...and I thought that was expensive.

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Well, after our latest fiasco...Heat/Air contractors aren't that expensive after all!

 

To make a long story short...

 

The water line for our refrigerator had been leaking for an unknown amount of time...just a fine mist.  We've been homeowners now for 10 years, and this is the first time we've ever dealt with anything like this.

 

This past summer, we had our air ducts replaced because of black mold growing in them...so, our first reaction to this water leak was, "Oh no, another mold problem!"  This weekend, I spent 12 hours pulling up engineered hardwood flooring that I had laid down about 5 years ago. The water had really spread out over a big area.  After getting the flooring up, only about 5 square feet of sub floor was a little wet.  

 

Remember, we've never experienced anything like this before...we didn't know to call the insurance company right away. We called them on Monday...they weren't happy that I removed the flooring, but they sent a contractor out to look at it (not an insurance person).  He sent another guy today to take care of business.

 

The guy today did the following...

 

1.  For about an hour, he scraped up linoleum from part of the floor of the affected area (I laid the hardwood over the linoleum in the kitchen and dining room).

2.  He set up a large dehumidifier in the affected area inside of the house.

3.  He set up a large dehumidifier in the crawl space under the affected area.

4.  He removed a few pieces of toe kicks from underneath the cabinets and set up a large fan to dry the area out under the cabinets.

 

Total time: +/- 2 hours.

 

I asked the boss who originally came on Monday what the cost for this would be if the insurance didn't cover it for some unknown reason.

 

He said, "It'll be around $1,200."

 

:jaw:

 

Those measly quotes we were given for replacing a thermostat weren't so bad after all!  :nuts:

 

If anyone wants to know...yes, you can put a wooden spoon in those large fans, and it'll bust the spoon up nicely without hurting the fan...at least our 3 year old son can.   :hide:

 

So sorry you had such a problem.

 

Several years back we had a commode run over, we called our insurance man, he sent an adjuster out. He looked everything over, left saying we would hear from them. We had no idea what the verdict would be.

 

When we bought this house it had carpet wall to wall all over it.

 

A few days after he left we got a check in the mail. It was big enough to cover all of our floor cost. Which we did not go back with all carpet. We put carpet only in the living room-kitchen, & 3 bedrooms. Them put vinyl flooring in the bathrooms, hall, & utility room ect. It covered the cost of this.

 

And we were very surprised at the outcome.

 

Well, at least your 3 year old son had some fun! Sure glad he did not get hurt.

 

Hope your insurance will pay for that.

 

One thing I've learned in my life, what can go wrong will go wrong, sooner or later, & never at a convenient time.

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Did the 1200.00 just include the tear out and dehumidifier? Or did it include putting things back together? Such as coming back and putting the wood floor back down. 1200.00 sounds high if they are going to stop when they pick up the dehumidifier, but if they are putting the floor back together it sounds about right. Especially if he is like me and tries to include some of the might go wrongs in an estimate rather than have a bad surprise at the end for the customer. I just finished a cabinet job that I estimated between 10,000 and 11,000. The total ended up just shy of 9,000 and I had a very surprised but happy customer. Would much rather happy surprised than mad at the end of the day.

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