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Churches That Are Against Having Drums In The Music...

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I find no mention of drums in the New Testament Church in my Bible.  Are they in yours?

Only percussion instruments I find mentioned in the New Testament are 'tinkling cymbals."  "Tinkling" doesn't paint a picture of deafening music, imo.

 

No Sir, not in the bible, playing the drums in the church. Then does this makes them of the devil?

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Piano is a percussion (yes, it's string, but it is also percussion) instrument too...so, on that basis no pianos allowed either.  :icon_smile:

 

The Bible - yes, in the OT, but that is still part of scripture that is inspired by God - tells us to worship God using a variety of instruments.  It is not the instrument but the player and the music played that become the problem. 

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Piano is a percussion (yes, it's string, but it is also percussion) instrument too...so, on that basis no pianos allowed either.  :icon_smile:

 

The Bible - yes, in the OT, but that is still part of scripture that is inspired by God - tells us to worship God using a variety of instruments.  It is not the instrument but the player and the music played that become the problem. 

 

 

How about the organ? :)

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Music arises out of culture.  In the context of worship, music is an expression of praise.  It is a response of our realization and understanding of what God has done for us. 

 

Having said that, the type of music is varied.  The culture of a church will impact the type of music that is used in worship.  A church in Africa, especially in tribal areas, will likely use drums.  Their music scales and rhythms are different, and unique to the geographical area.  When they realize what God has done, their expression will look very different, though the message will be the same.  

 

In southern U.S., you may find gospel music used.  In a predominately African-American church, the worship style will be very different and much more lively due to the cultural influences.  

 

There is no prohibition of any instrument in praise.  What is important is the heart and message.  Now, one thing I think is important is that in the context of corporate worship, the songs need to be written to be sung corporately.  Different types of lyric arrangement lends itself better to corporate singing vs. solo singing.  I do not see much of a use of solo singing for a church service since the purpose of a church service is to worship together.  But the styles will vary widely.

 

My church uses drums, guitars, pianos, saxophone, flute, mandolin, cello, etc.  We have a variety of styles, but we use the musical gifts and abilities of members.  It is a beautiful thing.  :-)

 

One more thing I will add, I think churches do need to be careful about how to present the music.  A church service is not a concert.  A church service is corporate worship where all people join together.  Making the music a production is not good.  For example, I've seen churches where musicians are center stage in the spotlight.  This can be dangerous because it becomes a performance.  It is better to have the musicians on the side, off center, so they are not the center of the service, but God remains central.

Edited by kindofblue1977

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Music arises out of culture.  In the context of worship, music is an expression of praise.  It is a response of our realization and understanding of what God has done for us. 

 

Having said that, the type of music is varied.  The culture of a church will impact the type of music that is used in worship.  A church in Africa, especially in tribal areas, will likely use drums.  Their music scales and rhythms are different, and unique to the geographical area.  When they realize what God has done, their expression will look very different, though the message will be the same.  

 

In southern U.S., you may find gospel music used.  In a predominately African-American church, the worship style will be very different and much more lively due to the cultural influences.  

 

There is no prohibition of any instrument in praise.  What is important is the heart and message.  Now, one thing I think is important is that in the context of corporate worship, the songs need to be written to be sung corporately.  Different types of lyric arrangement lends itself better to corporate singing vs. solo singing.  I do not see much of a use of solo singing for a church service since the purpose of a church service is to worship together.  But the styles will vary widely.

 

My church uses drums, guitars, pianos, saxophone, flute, mandolin, cello, etc.  We have a variety of styles, but we use the musical gifts and abilities of members.  It is a beautiful thing.  :-)

 

One more thing I will add, I think churches do need to be careful about how to present the music.  A church service is not a concert.  A church service is corporate worship where all people join together.  Making the music a production is not good.  For example, I've seen churches where musicians are center stage in the spotlight.  This can be dangerous because it becomes a performance.  It is better to have the musicians on the side, off center, so they are not the center of the service, but God remains central.

Actually, at least in certain parts of Africa, when folks become Christians one of the first things they do is destroy all the drums. For them, in certain parts of Africa, a drum is specifically considered an instrument of certain evil practices, so they do away with them.

 

That's specific to them, and doesn't mean all others do so, nor should they.

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Drums are historically of the heathen as they are used to accentuate the rhythm in music.  God's order for music is Melody, Harmony and Rhythm.  The world's order is the exact opposite.

 

Based upon what?  That order is certainly not set forth in the Bible.

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Based upon what?  That order is certainly not set forth in the Bible.

 

No, it's not. What is set forth in the Bible?  We have more principles than 'black and white' descriptions for this. So what do the principles say?

 

"Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things."Phil. 4:8

 

What kind of virtue (or lack thereof) is encouraged by a particular sort of music? What does it praise?

 

"Let no corrupt communication proceed out of your mouth, but that which is good to the use of edifying, that it may minister grace unto the hearers." Eph. 4:29

 

Does it edify - or does it feed the flesh?

 

"Dearly beloved, I beseech you as strangers and pilgrims, abstain from fleshly lusts, which war against the soul;" 1 Peter 2:11

 

"For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men, Teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world;  Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ; Who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works." Titus 2:11-14

 

Is it corrupt? What about its source? 

 

"Doth a fountain send forth at the same place sweet water and bitter?" James 3:11

 

 

What about its associations? Is the music specifically associated with stubborn sinners and a degenerate lifestyle? how is it used by the world, or by heretical groups?

 

"Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing; and I will receive you," 2 Cor. 6:17

 

"But ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people; that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvelous light:" 1 Peter 2:9

 

Does it encourage us to be more like Christ?

 

 
"For such an high priest became us, who is holy, harmless, undefiled, separate from sinners, and made higher than the heavens;"
Hebrews 7:26

 

Does its use in the congregation recognize that God does set standards for the practices used to worship Him, accepting some and rejecting others?   (The books of Moses)

 

Does its use reflect the principle that things be done decently and in order? Or is it overbearing and chaotic?  I think most uses of drums, even appropriately played, in small congregations or instrumental groups would probably overbear the congregational singing.

 

"Let all things be done decently and in order." 1 Cor. 14:10

 

Does it cause another brother to stumble?  (1 Cor. 8)

 

What picture is it giving to the world? What assumptions might they reasonably make about our beliefs or moral standards based on this music? (Bearing in mind that these assumptions might be made either via the music or the words.)
 

"Abstain from all appearance of evil." 1 Thess. 5:22

 

Has it been proven good?
 

"Prove all things; hold fast that which is good." 1 Thess. 5:21

 

 

 

  

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No, it's not. What is set forth in the Bible?  We have more principles than 'black and white' descriptions for this. So what do the principles say?

 

 

What kind of virtue (or lack thereof) is encouraged by a particular sort of music? What does it praise?

 

 

Does it edify - or does it feed the flesh?

 

 

Is it corrupt? What about its source? 

 

 

 

What about its associations? Is the music associated with stubborn sinners and a degenerate lifestyle? 

 

 

Does it encourage us to be more like Christ?

 

 

Does its use in the congregation recognize that God does set standards for the practices used to worship Him, accepting some and rejecting others?   (The books of Moses)

Does its use reflect the principle that things be done decently and in order? Or is it overbearing and chaotic?  I think most uses of drums, even appropriately played, in small congregations or instrumental groups would probably overbear the congregational singing.

 

 

Does it cause another brother to stumble?  (1 Cor. 8)

 

 

  

Different folks respond differently to different forms of music, drum beats and songs and such.

 

Scripture says nothing specific about drums or drum beats.

 

Along these lines, I do find it interesting that some IFBs will run the ailes, run all over the platform, some will get red faced spitting and spewing as they talk, yet if someone moves at all when a song is played they are accused of being fleshly.

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Different folks respond differently to different forms of music, drum beats and songs and such.

 

Scripture says nothing specific about drums or drum beats.

 

Exactly, which is why we need to look to the principles.

 

Along these lines, I do find it interesting that some IFBs will run the ailes, run all over the platform, some will get red faced spitting and spewing as they talk, yet if someone moves at all when a song is played they are accused of being fleshly.

 

Sounds like a good example of the pot calling the kettle black, eh?

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I am not against drums in their proper place.  In every Church I have ever attended where drums were used, the drummer would bang on the drums like he was at a rock concert..

For this reason, my stance is if anyone wants to bring drums to my Church, I probably won't allow it.

1 Corinthians 14:40 Let all things be done decently and in order.

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SFIC - come visit ours and you'll see drums used properly.  :wink

 

~~~~~~~~

 

Drums can be used to fit in with the world or to edify along with other instruments.  Again, it is the player and the music that makes the difference.

 

In fact, Psalm 150:4 tells us to praise God with a timbrel - which was a hand held drum.  Percussion instruments serve a purpose in the melody and rhythm of a piece.  Again, the problem comes along when the wrong type of music is played.  As John said, churches are individual and must make their own decisions. Some say yes to certain types of drums, some say no to all. That is their choice, and no sin in it as long as the music does not point to the flesh.

 

A full orchestra (which would necessitate drums) playing hymns is a beautiful sound.  Add a choir and the congregation singing and it is heavenly.  

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From what I read, the "timbrel" was more of a tamborine than a drum, though I suppose one could call the stretched skin over it something to "drum" upon.

At any rate, it doesn't appear to be the same as the drum sets that are prevalent in many worship groups today.

Of interest, the American Tract Society states that it was mostly the women of Israel who played the timbrels.

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The words (message) the most important part of the song (the message), if the accompaniment is equal to or overpowers the words we have a major problem.

Anytime the left hand alternating bass or arpeggio chording (rhythm, harmony/rhythm) on a piano, percussive instruments, or rhythm technique on string instruments, or organ pedal are prominent (instead of "back there somewhere"), we have a problem

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Does it sound like what the world is playing?  Like CCM does?  If so, it's wrong.  Our music ought to as different to the world as our lives.  If heard on the readio, there should be no question even within the first few notes about what type of music it is, worldly/Godly.

My personal philosophy for myself is that if it makes me want to tap my foot or get up and dance around, it's worldly music.  The music is as important as lyrics.  Good lyrics with bad music is bad music.

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From what I read, the "timbrel" was more of a tamborine than a drum, though I suppose one could call the stretched skin over it something to "drum" upon.
Yes, it is similar to a tambourine, but it isn't the same.  And drumming is what is done, even if it's only with the hand and not a stick.  A tambourine is also drummed, even though it has the addition of little "cymbals" to add a tinkling sound.  
At any rate, it doesn't appear to be the same as the drum sets that are prevalent in many worship groups today.
If we were to get technical, none of the instruments we use today are the same.  While there are similar instruments to what was played in the OT, the most are different.  But different doesn't make wrong.  I don't believe that God was naming instruments in scripture as a limit to what we can use.  Music was created by God, and instruments are used to enhance the music.
Of interest, the American Tract Society states that it was mostly the women of Israel who played the timbrels.

 

Just FYI - I don't have any problem at all with you not allowing drums in your church.  "Decently and in order" is quite the good reason for it, too.  Independent churches are a beautiful thing. 

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Many scholars say that timbrels were not played in the Temple.

Here's one...

A musical instrument played with the fingers. It makes a jingling sound and is often used in dancing (Ex 15:20; 1Sa 10:5; Ps 81:2; Isa 5:12). The Hebrew word is TOPH. "The toph is the most ancient of this type instrument [percussion]. Gesenius says that in the East it was constructed of a thin wooden rim covered with a membrane and hung around with brass bells or rattles. It was used to accompany the sacred dance (Ex 15:20). In Ge 31:27, it is called a `tabret.' It is somewhat similar to the tambourine. It was generally played on festive occasions, but is never mentioned in connection with the services of the Temple" (Paul McCommon, Music in the Bible).

Edited by Standing Firm In Christ

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Pianos weren't played in the temple, either.  It isn't the instrument that is bad.  It is how it is played.  

I would agree, HC.  But, as I said, in every Church I have been in that had drums, the drummer always ended up getting rocky.  Never failed.

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