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The Rapture

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Rapture

“For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first:
Then we which are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord.”  (1 Thess. 4:16,17)

    The Lord tells us to “comfort one another with these words”, (v. 18), and so let us take comfort in knowing that one day, perhaps soon, we will be taken out of this cruel and evil world, and meet the Lord in the air, “And so shall we ever be with the Lord”.
    The word “rapture” means “with great exuberance” or overwhelming joy.  One wonders if the thought of being taken up with the Lord is that exciting to many?   It will indeed be a day of “overwhelming joy” when we leave this world behind.  Think of it: no more murders; no more rapes; not child molestations, or drive-by shootings, nothing but rapturous joy.  
    There will eventually be no sorrow, no tears, no death or pain, and nothing to offend in the city of eternal day.  It will be a glorious place, with a street of gold, and a river coming out of the throne of God, called the river of life.   There will be trees on each side of the river was the tree of life, which bore twelve kinds of fruit, and they produced every month; and the leaves were for the healing of the nations.   Oh, what splendor; what beauty; what magnificence shall be ours!   
    We will leave this old world, and all its sin and degradation, to a peaceful place where all is in harmony and where the Just One reigns.  I can hardly wait when I think about it, are you ready?
 

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Ready and waiting. It's interesting that the general sense is that this will be such a horrifying and confusing event, which I suppose it will be for those left behind, but it will certainly be an exciting and joyous occasion for those of us that will be caught up.

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Yes, Truly, A wonderful day that will be when my Jesus I will see!!

I often day-dream of that last individual who receives the graceful salvation, we so often take in stride. Yet think of the next person who could have if we

would be a little more redemptive of our time.

                                                                      Our Moderation,, !!!''' THE LORD IS AT HAND  '''!!! 

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Rapture

“For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first:
Then we which are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord.”  (1 Thess. 4:16,17)

  1  The Lord tells us to “comfort one another with these words”, (v. 18), and so let us take comfort in knowing that one day, perhaps soon, we will be taken out of this cruel and evil world, and meet the Lord in the air, “And so shall we ever be with the Lord”.
    2The word “rapture” means “with great exuberance” or overwhelming joy.  One wonders if the thought of being taken up with the Lord is that exciting to many?   It will indeed be a day of “overwhelming joy” when we leave this world behind.  Think of it: no more murders; no more rapes; not child molestations, or drive-by shootings, nothing but rapturous joy.  
    There will eventually be no sorrow, no tears, no death or pain, and nothing to offend in the city of eternal day.  It will be a glorious place, with a street of gold, and a river coming out of the throne of God, called the river of life.   There will be trees on each side of the river was the tree of life, which bore twelve kinds of fruit, and they produced every month; and the leaves were for the healing of the nations.   Oh, what splendor; what beauty; what magnificence shall be ours!   
    We will leave this old world, and all its sin and degradation, to a peaceful place where all is in harmony and where the Just One reigns.  I can hardly wait when I think about it, are you ready?
 

1 However, consider the context-it actually is not a comfort of being removed from the cruel world, OR being removed before tribulation, but the truth of our once again being reunited with our loved ones wh have died in Christ and gone before us. Yes, it will be wonderful to be once and for all removed from this wicked body of sin, but this is not the context. I'm afraid this passage is often misinterpreted to mean something it doesn't.

 

2 The word we use, 'rapture', when referring to being removed from earth by Christ, does not mean 'great exuberance or overwhelming joy'. Rather, it means 'transport'. Interstingly, the word, from Webster's 1828 has a first meaning of 'a seizing by violence', which could also apply, as we will be abruptly and sudenly removed. Think of Elijah, how he was taken up-not in a chariot of fire, but in a whirlwind accompanied by a chariot of fire-seems like it might be a bit of a violent seizing, eh?

 

Just thought I'd bring these up. No argument of timing or anything.

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1 However, consider the context-it actually is not a comfort of being removed from the cruel world, OR being removed before tribulation, but the truth of our once again being reunited with our loved ones wh have died in Christ and gone before us. Yes, it will be wonderful to be once and for all removed from this wicked body of sin, but this is not the context. I'm afraid this passage is often misinterpreted to mean something it doesn't.
 
2 The word we use, 'rapture', when referring to being removed from earth by Christ, does not mean 'great exuberance or overwhelming joy'. Rather, it means 'transport'. Interstingly, the word, from Webster's 1828 has a first meaning of 'a seizing by violence', which could also apply, as we will be abruptly and sudenly removed. Think of Elijah, how he was taken up-not in a chariot of fire, but in a whirlwind accompanied by a chariot of fire-seems like it might be a bit of a violent seizing, eh?
 
Just thought I'd bring these up. No argument of timing or anything.


I agree with this meaning of rapture, it's not a Bible word but we use it to best describe the event. The Bible says "in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye" which is super fast, there will be no time to phone the lost relatives and get in one last witness!

I disagree with your thoughts about comfort in the passage, it can mean comforting one another about a number of things associated with the previous verse 17.

1 Thessalonians 4:17 Then we which are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord. 18 Wherefore comfort one another with these words.

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Some good thoughts, but the definition I gave of "rapture" was not from a Bible Dictionary, but from the actual meaning of the word today.  I realize that it is "caught up" as many claim, but wanted to emphasize the joy of it, and not merely the event.  I hear that the name was given out of criticism and unbelief, but it is a fitting name indeed for such a great event.

 

As for the context, Ukulelemike, I have a saying, "Some are so busy looking for the context that they miss the content of Scripture."  Not saying that context is not important, but no one challenged the apostles, when they spoke, and accused them of taking things out of context, though at times they seemed to do just that...

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...no one challenged the apostles, when they spoke, and accused them of taking things out of context, though at times they seemed to do just that...

 

Would like to add that they sometimes did measure their words against the scriptures.  Paul made reference to it but the verse escapes me.  

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Some good thoughts, but the definition I gave of "rapture" was not from a Bible Dictionary, but from the actual meaning of the word today.  I realize that it is "caught up" as many claim, but wanted to emphasize the joy of it, and not merely the event.  I hear that the name was given out of criticism and unbelief, but it is a fitting name indeed for such a great event.

 

As for the context, Ukulelemike, I have a saying, "Some are so busy looking for the context that they miss the content of Scripture."  Not saying that context is not important, but no one challenged the apostles, when they spoke, and accused them of taking things out of context, though at times they seemed to do just that...

My definition wasn't from a Bible dictionary, but the Webster's 1828 dictionary, being the first complete dictionary of English, and thus, we can find many of the meanings of the words used in the King James better than our current dictionaries, since word meanings have changed so much.

 

As for the context, the content IS found in the context. Preachers are terrible at removing things from intended context  and changing the content. Not to say we can't find many applications to passages, but to take it out of the immediate context is to make it mean whatever we like. That's wrong. Certaily in prophecy there can be mulitiple fulfillments, but that's because its in the context of a prophecy. In the case of 1Thess 4, there is a very clear context: being nthe comfort of meeting again our loved ones in the air, but many have ignored that context and made it mean we can be comforted in being raptured before the Tribulation period, otherwise there would be no comfort. But that's not why we get the comfort-its seeing our loved ones again.

 

"But I would not have you to be ignorant, brethren, concerning them which are asleep, that ye sorrow not, even as others which have no hope. For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so them also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with him. For this we say unto you by the word of the Lord, that we which are alive [and] remain unto the coming of the Lord shall not prevent them which are asleep. For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first: Then we which are alive [and] remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord. Wherefore comfort one another with these words."

 

All through this is the thread of the context-if we ignore it and just make it apply to what we want, especially something it has nothing to do with, like timing of the rapture, we miss the purpose of the comfort, and thus, the reason the Lord gave us the passage.

 

And the reason no one bothered the Apostles with context, is because they understood and gave the correct context. The problem was the Pharisees and Jews ignored much of the context, thus missing Christ as suffering Servant, because all they wanted was a Messiah King.

 

**edit** And yes, we CAN certainly find comfort in the fact of the rapture, not arguing that-we just must first and primarily seek the proper context of a passage to get all the Lord has for us in His word. Its just, I virtually never hear any Baptist preacher, (which I am) actually refer to this in the proper context, except maybe in a funeral service. That's a shame.

Edited by Ukulelemike

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The immediate text is where we disagree bro Ukulele, what would those that have no loved ones in heaven find comfort in if your explanation were the case?    When we "comfort one another with these words", we are comforting them according to the last few verses where

we have the promise of heaven.

 

"For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first:
Then we which are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord."
 

As for context and content, let the Bible say what it says plainly, and not what we explain it to say!

example:

Deuteronomy 22:5

2 Chronicles 7:14

 

(I offer these, not for contention, but to make my point.  The Bible says what it says, taken literally, let's not explain it away.)

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The immediate text is where we disagree bro Ukulele, what would those that have no loved ones in heaven find comfort in if your explanation were the case?    When we "comfort one another with these words", we are comforting them according to the last few verses where

we have the promise of heaven.

 

"For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first:
Then we which are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord."
 

As for context and content, let the Bible say what it says plainly, and not what we explain it to say!

example:

Deuteronomy 22:5

2 Chronicles 7:14

 

(I offer these, not for contention, but to make my point.  The Bible says what it says, taken literally, let's not explain it away.)

I suppose that works if you chop up the passage and add extra contexts to it, but the immediate text IS that of our loved ones who have gone before. The entire immediate text is from verse 13 to 18: its all one thought. It mentions those loved ones who sleep in Christ no less than four times in the passage, and when it ends with "Wherefore, let us comfort one another with these words", its basically saying, "Because of this, let us confort one another..."

 

However, since parts of my posts are still being ignored, let me reiterate: Yes, we CAN receive comfort in the simple fact that there will be a day when the Lord will come and remove his people from this world of sin and death. Absolutely. And for those who have no loved ones in Heaven to meet with, I guess we can't comfort them with hope of seeing their loved ones, but we CAN comfort them in the fact of the coming of Christ for them. And my wife, who recently lost her mother, who died without Christ, with a hard heart, agress that she CAN find comfort, but she agrees that the meaning of the verses is more specifically to those who have lost loved ones in Christ.

 

**edit: added to a thought.

Edited by Ukulelemike

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Ok, I concede, but why can't those who have gone on before refer to saints that are awaiting their glorified bodies?  The text is not that specific.

 

I had to come back and say the v. 6 and v.10 both speak of "brethren" and not necessarily family.

Edited by irishman

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I started an article on our website about Steve Anderson's video "After the Tribulation" that addresses some of the post trib, and similar arguments that mid trib and pre-wrath postions. http://dorightchristians.wordpress.com/2013/01/15/steve-andersons-after-the-tribulation-a-refutation/

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Ok, I concede, but why can't those who have gone on before refer to saints that are awaiting their glorified bodies?  The text is not that specific.

 

I had to come back and say the v. 6 and v.10 both speak of "brethren" and not necessarily family.

Absolutely! They are not necessarily family, but those we know, of the brethren, be they blood relative or spiritual relatives-those who sleep in Christ. My pastor, and another pastor who was a verty close friend and father in the faith to me, both passed away recently-good, godly men I love and will miss, but I don't sorrow, because when the Lord returns, I will see them again because He will bring them with Him, and I find great comfort in this.  And that I will be going, too! Woo-Hoo!

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In chapter 5 of 1 Thess, only 11 verses later Paul repeats the instruction to comfort one another, so I think the comforting he's referring in both places can be applied to most of what he's spoken about in each chapter prior to saying it. There's many things he's listed to be comfortable about, amen. We are truly blessed.

 

1 Thessalonians 5:11 Wherefore comfort yourselves together, and edify one another, even as also ye do.

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