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Is A Mohawk Sin?

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As a parent, we understand the implications of a certain haircut and as stated a 5 year old doesn't.  That is why we are the parents and have the final say so- whether our young child understands the reasoning or not. 

 

I kind of compare it to how God gives us "rules" that we sometimes don't understand as babes in Christ but we follow them anyway because He does know best- and as we mature in His Word, His "rules" make sense.

 

Our culture has expectations as to what a "real Christian" should look like. I am not saying that is right or wrong, just fact.  If two people were walking down the street- one punked out, and the other clean cut- and I said that one was a Christian, most people (saved and unsaved) would choose the clean cut one because of his look.  However, in reality the punked out one could be a newly saved Christian who is still being convicted on wordliness and the clean cut one could be a lost prep. It is all appearence. But it still shows that most people have an idea as to what a Christian looks like.  ( I actually took a poll from the ladies in jail- unanimously the clean-cut won).

 

Our witness (look, attitude, daily walk) should reflect our God and our Saviour and if my son having a mohawk will hurt my testimony (right or wrong), then he will not have a mohawk. As a parent, I have the final say-so. Not my young child.

 

KatnHat

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As a parent, we understand the implications of a certain haircut and as stated a 5 year old doesn't.  That is why we are the parents and have the final say so- whether our young child understands the reasoning or not. 

 

I kind of compare it to how God gives us "rules" that we sometimes don't understand as babes in Christ but we follow them anyway because He does know best- and as we mature in His Word, His "rules" make sense.

 

Our culture has expectations as to what a "real Christian" should look like. I am not saying that is right or wrong, just fact.  If two people were walking down the street- one punked out, and the other clean cut- and I said that one was a Christian, most people (saved and unsaved) would choose the clean cut one because of his look.  However, in reality the punked out one could be a newly saved Christian who is still being convicted on wordliness and the clean cut one could be a lost prep. It is all appearence. But it still shows that most people have an idea as to what a Christian looks like.  ( I actually took a poll from the ladies in jail- unanimously the clean-cut won).

 

Our witness (look, attitude, daily walk) should reflect our God and our Saviour and if my son having a mohawk will hurt my testimony (right or wrong), then he will not have a mohawk. As a parent, I have the final say-so. Not my young child.

 

KatnHat

 

And of course if a persons son has a Mohawk hair cut it reflects upon them.

 

I have a cousin that attends the liberal SBC. Throughout high school his oldest son always had long stringy hair. It always looked as if needed washing & a good brushing.  I always thought it reflected bad on his parents. So many parents today will not reel in their children allowing them to do just as they please.

 

Today many parents are their children's best friend, not their parents.

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Just wanted to throw something out here:

 

Growing up between two vastly different cultures ( Amish and English - loooong twisted story lol) I didn't understand a lot of the things about how my plain side lived and the other side of the family lived another. It was very confusing at such a young age. I don't remember much about what I asked or was confused about but what I do remember is my adopted parents trying their best to explain. Plus I got a chance at that early stage of life to understand what conviction and discipline was.

 

Kids are better off with an honest "no" then a "yes" out of complacency,trust me.

Edited by Retronatrix

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Just wanted to throw something out here:

 

Growing up between two vastly different cultures ( Amish and English - loooong twisted story lol) I didn't understand a lot of the things about how my plain side lived and the other side of the family lived another. It was very confusing at such a young age. I don't remember much about what I asked or was confused about but what I do remember is my adopted parents trying their best to explain. Plus I got a chance at that early stage of life to understand what conviction and discipline was.

 

Kids are better off with an honest "no" then a "yes" out of complacency,trust me.

 

Yes, honest parents for sure.

 

I was not exactly adopted, but had my rounds, & at just before 5 years of age found myself in a good home.

 

Since those days starting back in the 40's, & my experiences, I've told parents who adopt above all be truthful & hones from the beginning with your children, many of them have treated me as if I had lost my mind. Some seem to think lying to them is best.

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My 5 year old son wanted a mohawk. My wife and I are not lovers of the hairstyle. We have 2 girls and 2 boys. While they are living at home, we are rearing the girls to have long hair and the boys short hair. The mohawk is definately short. We wanted to say no, but didn't. Why didn't we? Our children are very good at hearing the word "no" and obeying with very little whining. The problem is, we say "no" alot. Just going to Wal-mart, our children see alot of the "world" and we have to frequently say "no" and usually give an explaination. So when it came to the mohawk, we didn't just blurt out a "no" because I wanted a Biblical explanation as to why I was saying no. The only thing I could come up with was separation from the world. Just one problem, my world and my children's world doesn't have any mohawks. Two years ago, my neice's hubby got a mohawk and kept it for a couple months. He lives 4 hours away and is supposedly a Christian so I didn't feel this fell under worldly separation. That is the only place I can think of that my son has even seen a mohawk. He is not trying to fit into a group. He is homeschooled and there aren't any mohawks at church.

So my 5 yo has a mohawk. Problem. My parents saw this and immediately told him they didn't like his hair; they were quite blunt. The other night, my dad said it was sad my son had a mohawk since he didn't have any choice in the matter. My dad thinks I wanted my son to have this mohawk and that it is sad I am forcing such a "worldly" haircut on him??? This is the same man that pokes fun at me because we live so conservatively, in his eyes we might as well be Amish. So now both my parents think I am pushing worldliness on my son. Now I am wondering if I should cut my sons hair because it might be a stumbling block for my parents. Isn't "falsely accusing" me of pushing worldliness on my son, when I am not, a sin? Do I need to cut my son's hair because I am causing my parents to sin? If I tell him he is going to have to get rid of the mohawk, I want my Bible in hand to explain it to him. Do I need to do this and how do I do this? Any thoughts??

 

I think it depends.

 

First of all, let's remember that hairstyles are cultural and, thus, subjective. Remember that, in the 19th century, most men had long hair that would have been considered "sinful" by many Christians just fifty years later and, fifty years after that, would have been considered short by most Christians.

 

While it's true that some hairstyles are associated with rebellion, I seriously doubt your five year old wants a mohawk to protest against societal norms.

 

From what you've described, I don't see how you would be causing your parents to sin, but I would explain to your child, in age appropriate language, that how we present ourselves on the outside presents a message to the world about us. That's why we dress up when we go to church, because we have reverence for God, or why we dress for court or weddings, because we have respect for the sanctity of those institutions, or why we dress casually to go to a ball game, because that's about fun and recreation.

 

Personally, when I see a mohawk, my first thought isn't about punks or rebellion, but "Airborne!"

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I think it depends.

 

First of all, let's remember that hairstyles are cultural and, thus, subjective. Remember that, in the 19th century, most men had long hair that would have been considered "sinful" by many Christians just fifty years later and, fifty years after that, would have been considered short by most Christians.

 

While it's true that some hairstyles are associated with rebellion, I seriously doubt your five year old wants a mohawk to protest against societal norms.

 

From what you've described, I don't see how you would be causing your parents to sin, but I would explain to your child, in age appropriate language, that how we present ourselves on the outside presents a message to the world about us. That's why we dress up when we go to church, because we have reverence for God, or why we dress for court or weddings, because we have respect for the sanctity of those institutions, or why we dress casually to go to a ball game, because that's about fun and recreation.

 

Personally, when I see a mohawk, my first thought isn't about punks or rebellion, but "Airborne!"

Even those in the military who wear some form of Mohawk do so out of rebellion and pride.

 

In America a Mohawk only sends a worldly message, never a Christian one.

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A lot of US soldiers during WWII and Vietnam wore mohawk haircuts. So it isn't necessarily derived from the Punk rock movement.

 

The Mohawks and other Indians wore this hair style so they wouldn't get scalped by their enemies. The Indians were encouraged by Europeans to scalp. A Frenchman/Englishman would require it from them as proof that they killed their enemies. Good bounty was involved and even whites would do a lot of scalping of Indians.  

 

Other peoples throughout history have worn mohawks.

 

Today, it is most associated with the Punkers.

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Even those in the military who wear some form of Mohawk do so out of rebellion and pride.

 

In America a Mohawk only sends a worldly message, never a Christian one.

 

I think that's subjective. If that's the message you take away from mohawks, then I think you have an obligation not to get a mohawk.

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I think that's subjective. If that's the message you take away from mohawks, then I think you have an obligation not to get a mohawk.

I've yet to meet anyone with a Mohawk this wasn't true of.

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mohawks arent a sin you are so narrow minded i am a girl and ive been begging my parents to let me get one what do you think they said no of course then i started to rebel cause i didnt get what i wanted which is my right

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mohawks arent a sin you are so narrow minded i am a girl and ive been begging my parents to let me get one what do you think they said no of course then i started to rebel cause i didnt get what i wanted which is my right

Are you born again in Christ?

 

Do you know God says we are to honor our parents, which means even when we don't get our way?

 

Do you realize that God says the "rights" of a child are to obey God and their parents?

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The only rights we have when it comes to our body and appearance are the rights that God gives us. The government may say we have certain rights, but if those "rights" infringe on the Christian character, then we are not to cling to, nor fight for, those "rights".

Paul instructed the women to have a modest appearance. There is nothing modest about a Mohawk on women....or on a man, for that matter.


Colossians 3:20 KJV
[20] Children, obey your parents in all things: for this is well pleasing unto the Lord.

Edited by Standing Firm In Christ

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mohawks arent a sin you are so narrow minded i am a girl and ive been begging my parents to let me get one what do you think they said no of course then i started to rebel cause i didnt get what i wanted which is my right



Did you read the whole thread?

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It is wonderful that you want to tell your son why you have the rules, OP! It bothers me sometimes when we Baptists have rules that we really cannot back up. There are a few standards my husband and I disagree on for that reason, but of course his rules are final. But they are difficult to explain to the kids. I would say that the Mohawk history would be a good explanation against it.

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It is wonderful that you want to tell your son why you have the rules, OP! It bothers me sometimes when we Baptists have rules that we really cannot back up. There are a few standards my husband and I disagree on for that reason, but of course his rules are final. But they are difficult to explain to the kids. I would say that the Mohawk history would be a good explanation against it.

Amen! We should be able to explain why we have a rule or standard. If we can't explain such, that should give us pause and cause us to search out things on the matter.

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Mt 15:4 For God commanded, saying, Honour thy father and mother:

 

1Sa 15:23 For rebellion is as the sin of witchcraft, and stubbornness is as iniquity and idolatry. Because thou hast rejected the word of the LORD, he hath also rejected thee from being king.

 

Ro 12:1 ¶ I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service.
Ro 12:2 And be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind, that ye may prove what is that good, and acceptable, and perfect, will of God.
 
Yet I don't believe these verses will do any good, rebellion is a sinful thing.

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You are over-thinking this:  I actually trust your instinct.  A chance to say "yes" when possible is not a bad reason to permit something.  I feel the same way about my kids sometimes. 

The kid is....................FIVE!!  It's not a big deal.  He is YOUR son, not your parents'.  One honors their parents (which has as much to do with financially caring for them as much as anything else) but letting them raise your son is not "honoring" them.  If you can't do it with a clear conscience with respect to your own instincts and your own reading of Scripture, then don't let him do it.  It isn't "REBELLION" on the part of your son to want the mohawk.  He just wants it, because at the moment he thinks it looks kinda cool.  Does it look cool? NO....on a five-year-old...it just kinda looks like a five-year-old got the haircut he wanted to try.  He'll probably get over it in a matter of weeks or months anyway.
 
It is YOUR conscience and YOUR understanding of the Scripture which matters, not the bloviations of judgemental people who see a witch under every rock and a demon around every corner and spend their entire lives hunting for them and trying to wipe them out.  As much as I am an IFB...and love being one.....some fundamentalists are too worldly-MINDED that they see "worldliness" in almost everything.  Forget the witch-hunters.  I could find something "worldly" with just about any haircut sported today if I tried hard enough, including the Mr. Rogers look sported by the average IFB.  It is not expressly a Scriptural command, thus it is not a "SIN".  Is it "wise"?...meh.....it's up to you to decide that, not your parents or your pastor or anyone on this board to tell you that.
 
I think there's a place every now and again to "let your hair down a little" (pun intended).

Edited by Heir of Salvation

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What is the Mohawk generally associated with?

Punkers, thugs, brawlers, gangsters, etc..

Sure, the kid is only five. But even on a five-year-old the style can say a lot. It may paint a picture of a rebellious parent who is teaching his son to grow up like him.

To some, the child may look cute. But in today's society, the majority could see the onset of rebellion. And what of school? Will such a cut cause any problems from teachers? From classmates? From bullies?

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One thing my husband uses for some of our standards, since he is a pastor, is the idea of an above-board testimony....not causing others to stumble. For instance, I desperately want to take my kids to see "Despicable Me 2" in July when it comes out in the theater. However, my husband says no, because it is not a good testimony. Sure, maybe that's the only movie we would ever see at the theater, but then our church people may say "Well the preacher goes to the theater, so I can go too, and watch this R rated movie." Another thing we've discussed is that I think it's pretty when girls have two piercings in their ears, ONLY because if they wear a little diamond in the top one, and a small gold hoop in the second one, I feel it's very feminine. Again....it's a slippery slope and possibly a bad testimony. Is it wrong? No more wrong than having ONE hole. But does it tend towards the multiple piercings idea and thus a slippery slope? How many piercings is wrong? What part of the body is "wrong" to pierce? Well we all know that having about 25 piercings is rebellious and worldly, so my husband sets the line at a single ear piercing. Explanation? Testimony...being above board....being a Christian example. Which is a fine explanation, really, because we are to be "living sacrifices, holy, acceptable unto God, which is our reasonable service. Be not conformed to this world, but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind...."

The same reasoning for the mohawk. Is it Biblically wrong? Probably not, although if you look in the Old Testament...remember the time when Israel got into war or something, and then to shame this group of men (can't place the story at the moment)) they shaved off half their heads and half their beards, and sent them home that way. It was a horrible, despicable shame on these men. So partially shaved heads were not something they did back then. As far as today, the only examples of mohawks are Indians with spirit gods, or the punk rock generation. So therefore, your explanation could be that a funny haircut made the men in the Bible embarrassed...and then after that, the only people who wore that haircut were Indians or rock and roll guys....and therefore, even though it would be fun to wear one, it would be a poor testimony to your friends and family.

One thing you could do for him is to, during a haircut, cut the mohawk, then take a picture of him, and then finish the haircut, and then let him have the picture in his room as something "fun". I actually cut a mohawk into one of my kids during a haircut like that just to be funny but they refused to even look in the mirror and begged me to cut it off. LOL. But of course I never planned NOT to cut it off.

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 I think we are often so obsessed (in a certain weird way) with "worldliness" itself....that we are in fact...."Worldly".  I think we err often by being on such a witch-hunt against everything we dislike, and finding reasons to condemn them, that our minds are actually pre-occupied inexplicably, with worldly things.

We are often so busy "denouncing" everything "worldly" that we don't realize that we are mentally obsessing over things "of this World"....and that is IMO equally as un-productive an error as permitting a 5-year old to have a marginally stupid-looking hair-cut for the next 8 weeks if he wants it.

 

The incredibly nuanced and in-depth explanations (for instance) about why a certain hair-cut which is:

1.) Distinctively MASCULINE

2.) Satisfies the Scriptural condition (by any standard) of being "short" vis-à-vis  I Cor. 11:7

 

Is possibly inherently "evil" or "worldly" for a 5-year old boy misses the entire point.

IMO the realm of the mind is where the Spiritual battles are fought and can only by obsessed over by those who are so pre-occupied with the "things of this world" that they can even have taken the time to have developed an argument against something which is otherwise morally benign.

 

I think one has to have mentally obsessed over "worldly" things to quite an extreme to be able to correctly identify something which is inherently morally neutral as "worldly".

IMO....that is an example of LOSING the battle of the mind: (Romans 12:2)......not winning it.

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