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    • By 1Timothy115 in Devotionals
         11
      Psalms 119:1-8                                         Sep. 5 - Oct. 2, 2019
      1 ALEPH. Blessed are the undefiled in the way, who walk in the law of the LORD.
      2 Blessed are they that keep his testimonies, and that seek him with the whole heart.
      3 They also do no iniquity: they walk in his ways.
      4 Thou hast commanded us to keep thy precepts diligently.
      5 O that my ways were directed to keep thy statutes!
      6 Then shall I not be ashamed, when I have respect unto all thy commandments.
      7 I will praise thee with uprightness of heart, when I shall have learned thy righteous judgments.
      8 I will keep thy statutes: O forsake me not utterly.
      The following verse stood out to me...
      5 O that my ways were directed to keep thy statutes!
      At first glance it seemed to me this person’s soul is poured out with intense desire to have God’s direction in keeping His Word.
      I made a small wood fire in our backyard for my granddaughter, Julia, since she would be staying overnight with us. My wife and Julia stayed outside at the fire for about half an hour. Then, I found myself alone to watch the fire die out on a particularly lovely evening. So I took my verse from above and began to repeat it for memorization. As I repeated the verse, I tried to contemplate the words and apply them to what I was seeing around me. 
      The moon and stars were out now peering through the scattered clouds above.
      [Genesis 1:16 And God made two great lights; the greater light to rule the day, and the lesser light to rule the night: he made the stars also. Genesis 1:17 And God set them in the firmament of the heaven to give light upon the earth, Genesis 1:18 And to rule over the day and over the night, and to divide the light from the darkness: and God saw that it was good.]
      Thought 1         
      The moon has stayed his course since the day God created him, also the stars, obeying the statutes directed by God from the first day they were created. Can you imagine God’s direction to the Moon and stars, “moon you will have a path through the sky above the earth, stars you will occupy the firmament above the moon and be clearly visible in the cloudless night sky.”
      Then, the trees, grass, even the air we breathe obey the statues God gave them from the beginning. None of these creations have souls, none have hearts, none have intelligence, but they all observe God’s statutes, His instructions for their limited time on earth.
      Thought 2
      What if we were like the moon, stars, trees, grass, or the other creations which have no soul? We would be directed to keep God’s statutes without choosing to keep them. This is not the image of God, there would be no dominion over other creatures, or over the earth. We would not be capable of experiencing the joy and peace of learning the love of God
      Genesis 1:26 And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.
      Philippians 4:7 And the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus.
      Thought 3 (October 2, 2019)
      Is the psalmist pleading God to force God’s statutes to become the man’s ways? No, he is speaking of his own failure in keeping God’s statutes and his desire to keep them, very much like Paul in Romans 7:14-25.
      God doesn’t work through force to turn men from their ways that they would desire His statutes or desire God Himself. Men must reject (repent) put aside his own ways and voluntarily seek God and His statutes.

Pastoral Qualifications

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  • Independent Fundamental Baptist

Brother Jerry,

Would you counsel a remarried woman to divorce her current spouse?

Would you counsel her to try and hook up with her original spouse, even if he was remarried as well?

Please don't brush these questions aside, they're very serious and very real applicable questions based on what you just said.




1st, please remember, I'm not calling them a 2nd rate Christians. I firmly believe if they truly seek God for forgiveness the sin can and will be forgiven. No I would not counsel her to divorce and return to her 1st husband, that would be adding sin on top of sin. Yet I have heard of a few that would do so. The only thing I pointed to was her husband would not meet the qualification to be a pastor of Jesus' New Testament Church.
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  • Independent Fundamental Baptist

No I would not counsel her to divorce and return to her 1st husband, that would be adding sin on top of sin. Yet I have heard of a few that would do so. The only thing I pointed to was her husband would not meet the qualification to be a pastor of Jesus' New Testament Church.



Well I agree with that but I wonder how you reconcile that with your post #37 where you seem to say that you feel a divorced person that has remarried is living in a state of continued adultery if their ex-spouse is still living. It would seem that if those where your views you would indeed counsel someone who had divorced and re-married to divorce their current spouse. Obviously you couldn't condone a person staying is a state of "continued adultery". Perhaps I misunderstood what you were saying in post #37 though.
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  • Independent Fundamental Baptist

Seems there’s some thing we don’t like about the Bible, perhaps when it comes to divorce, there be many things we do not like about it.

Ro 7:3 So then if, while her husband liveth, she be married to another man, she shall be called an adulteress: but if her husband be dead, she is free from that law; so that she is no adulteress, though she be married to another man.
The verse is clear, as long as the woman’s husband liveth, she is know as an adulteress

Now. Let us stick to topic, if a man marries her, he is no longer blameless, therefore he does not meet the qualifications of a New Testament pastor in Jesus Churches.

Off topic portion, no, I would not advise anyone to sin more, add sin on top of sin. For this woman to go through another divorce, would be to sin again.

God’s thoughts on divorce seems to be harsh to us humans, and we look for loop hole to get around God’s way.

1Co 7:10 ¶ And unto the married I command, yet not I, but the Lord, Let not the wife depart from her husband:
1Co 7:11 But and if she depart, let her remain unmarried, or be reconciled to her husband: and let not the husband put away his wife.

Of course there is a choice, stay married, don’t get a divorce, or if the divorced comes, do not get married. Yes, I know, few there be that likes those choices, so there be few that obey God on this matter and there be many that many that refuse to obey this. And they be those who will not take a proper stand on this fearing what people will think, and today we have many divorced and remarried people in many churches so many pastors deal with this subject very liberally trying to appease those who have divorced and remarried, and or in order to perform marriages for such people.

I know of many divorce people who have remarried with a church wedding with their pastor performing the ceremony. As far as I'm concerned that is mockery.

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  • Independent Fundamental Baptist

How sad that a clear Biblical principle has to be the source of such an argument with supposedly likeminded people.

My dad, after my mom died, married a divorced woman. He did it in full knowledge that the Bible teaches he can minister in absolutely any way other than pastor and deacon. He currently teaches Sunday School, does marriage and financial counseling, and of course is an active and faithful member of the church. He is serving God in a full manner. He is simply not a pastor, and not a deacon. How hard is that to understand?

In my opinion, the "you can get divorced" thing in the Bible is speaking of during Jewish betrothal, i.e. see Joseph and Mary. Once the couple is physically joined, I believe divorce is not an option (in God's eyes) unless there is danger to the spouse, in which case you of course separate...or of course if the lost half leaves, he leaves. Remarriage not smiled upon by God.

Practically speaking, those verse are pretty much moot these days. Everyone is getting divorced and remarried, its almost useless to try to enforce these days. However....a pastor or deacon must be a married couple that has not been divorced, EITHER of them. The qualifications put for the deacons wife could easily be applied to a pastors wife and pretty much if a wife is up to par with those qualifications, she hasn't been divorced in her life.

For those who would put up the "straw man" of that "lust in your heart" stuff...that's ridiculous. Let God be the judge of that.

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  • Independent Fundamental Baptist

Seems there’s some thing we don’t like about the Bible, perhaps when it comes to divorce, there be many things we do not like about it.

Ro 7:3 So then if, while her husband liveth, she be married to another man, she shall be called an adulteress: but if her husband be dead, she is free from that law; so that she is no adulteress, though she be married to another man.
The verse is clear, as long as the woman’s husband liveth, she is know as an adulteress


Question. How many times does a woman need to commit adultery in order to be an adulteress? Just one right?

Now. Let us stick to topic, if a man marries her, he is no longer blameless, therefore he does not meet the qualifications of a New Testament pastor in Jesus Churches.


To that I agree, I do not think a man is qualified to pastor if either he or his wife have been divorced and re-married no matter if it was their fault or the fault of the former spouse.

Off topic portion, no, I would not advise anyone to sin more, add sin on top of sin. For this woman to go through another divorce, would be to sin again.


Let me get this straight, as I am having a hard time believing you would actually hold this position as it seems totally illogical. You believe that a woman that has been divorced and remarried is living in a state of continued adultery right? Yet even though you believe this second marriage is a state of continued adultery you still think it would be wrong to divorce again to get out of this state of continued adultery. I guess I don't see how that position could make any sort of sense. If I believed a re-married divorcee was in a state of constant adultery the sensible thing would be to tell them to get out of that situation just like you would tell unmarried people that were "living together" that they were in the wrong and need to get out of that situation either by separating or getting married.



Of course there is a choice, stay married, don’t get a divorce, or if the divorced comes, do not get married. Yes, I know, few there be that likes those choices, so there be few that obey God on this matter and there be many that many that refuse to obey this. And they be those who will not take a proper stand on this fearing what people will think, and today we have many divorced and remarried people in many churches so many pastors deal with this subject very liberally trying to appease those who have divorced and remarried, and or in order to perform marriages for such people.

I know of many divorce people who have remarried with a church wedding with their pastor performing the ceremony. As far as I'm concerned that is mockery.


I have no problem with that, I agree that it is wrong to get a divorce, and having done that it is wrong to re-marry while the ex-spouse is living. The issue however is what is the biblical approach when someone has already been divorced and re-married. I think such a situation is not a desirable one and I do not think individuals in such situations are qualified to pastor, yet I do not think they are living in a state of continued sin by staying in their current marriage. Contrary wise I think they would be sinning to get out of it. Your position, as I understand it anyway, seems to be saying they are in the sin of adultery for staying in the marriage, and in sin if they get out of it. In short they are stuck in a state of sin and nothing they could do about it would be right. I don't think God puts people in that situation. There is always a right choice available even if past wrong choices have placed you in a undesirable situation. Edited by Seth-Doty
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Mt 5:32 But I say unto you, That whosoever shall put away his wife, saving for the cause of fornication, causeth her to commit adultery: and whosoever shall marry her that is divorced committeth adultery

Ro 7:3 So then if, while her husband liveth, she be married to another man, she shall be called an adulteress: but if her husband be dead, she is free from that law; so that she is no adulteress, though she be married to another man..

1Co 7:10 ¶ And unto the married I command, yet not I, but the Lord, Let not the wife depart from her husband:
1Co 7:11 But and if she depart, let her remain unmarried, or be reconciled to her husband: and let not the husband put away his wife.

Seth, The Bible tells us that the woman that is divorced, remarried she; "... shall be called an adulteress..." Romans 7:3. And shall be know as an adulteress so long as her divorced husband lives, that is what it says, nothing more, nothing less.


Suzy, Your 100% right, in most of today's churches divorce, as well as adultery, fornication, and many other sins are moot points. I know of a few churches in our area that has shacked up members that are in good standing, that are serving in positions in churches. The pastors must fear saying anything for at least 3 or more reasons, fear of physical harm, fear of being sent walking, fear of losing members. And it seems none of the church members will speak up either, it seems they go along with it. So I suppose most of today's people fear not God, yet have a big fear of man. Not even 10 years ago could you find this stuff taking place in this area, yet its now common.

Edited by Jerry80871852
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  • Independent Fundamental Baptist




Well I agree with that but I wonder how you reconcile that with your post #37 where you seem to say that you feel a divorced person that has remarried is living in a state of continued adultery if their ex-spouse is still living. It would seem that if those where your views you would indeed counsel someone who had divorced and re-married to divorce their current spouse. Obviously you couldn't condone a person staying is a state of "continued adultery". Perhaps I misunderstood what you were saying in post #37 though.


That's what I was wondering too.
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  • Independent Fundamental Baptist

Maybe what he said in post #41 was that living in a second marriage was adultery, but that it would be a sin to divorce from that second marriage because divorce is always a sin. Furthermore, remarriage is always a sin, so to bust up your adulterous marriage to get back to your original once-acceptable marriage would actually be adultery all over again, making your originally marriage another adulterous marriage. Maybe it would be okay to live in an adulterous marriage so long as you're not having sex and committing adultery against your one living spouse that you’re not allowed to remarry. No, that would be a violation of the command to have sex with your spouse in I Cor. 7.

Nuttier than Grandma's fruitcake last Christmas.

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Maybe what he said in post #41 was that living in a second marriage was adultery, but that it would be a sin to divorce from that second marriage because divorce is always a sin. Furthermore, remarriage is always a sin, so to bust up your adulterous marriage to get back to your original once-acceptable marriage would actually be adultery all over again, making your originally marriage another adulterous marriage. Maybe it would be okay to live in an adulterous marriage so long as you're not having sex and committing adultery against your one living spouse that you’re not allowed to remarry. No, that would be a violation of the command to have sex with your spouse in I Cor. 7.

Nuttier than Grandma's fruitcake last Christmas.


Brother, this is the crazy road someone ends up heading down when the refuse to see that Paul was speaking of polygamy (common among the Jews but hated by the Greeks and Romans). This "two living wives" nonosense leaves one's head spinning. God never intended things to be this complicated or for his "qualification"s to have all these pitfalls and loopholes. Like I said, my friend who felt called to be a pastor was told he'd have to leave his Christian wife (they both got saved after they got married) and go back to his orignial unsaved wife in order to be a pastor because he has two living wives. Of course this wasn't bad enough for them not to take his tithe money though or two preach for a Scofield bible.

Not all the loons are in the looney bin Edited by Wilchbla
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  • Independent Fundamental Baptist

Wilchbla, Your way off, get back to the Bible.

As for the other, I've explained it, the trouble is your not accepting my answer, it comical to me at the number of times people will say a person has not answered when the truth is they don't accept the answer that has been given.

Now, if y'all want to counsel people to add sin on top of sin, so be it, not I.

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  • Independent Fundamental Baptist

The Bible doesn't specifically address that question, but there are other principles that can be applied to answer it. I've heard some folks say "husband of one wife" addresses the rampant polygamy going on in those days, and essentially the phrase means husband of one wife at a time. However, the gospels record Jesus' thoughts on the issue of divorce.

Luke 16:18 - Whosoever putteth away his wife, and marrieth another, committeth adultery: and whosoever marrieth her that is put away from her husband committeth adultery.

Therefore, if Jesus equates divorce and remarriage with adultery, then I don't believe a man who marries/is married to a divorced woman is qualified to hold a pastorate, or be a deacon, for that matter.


I agree. Jesus makes it clear on divorce, but he doesn't give any leeway to remarriage. In fact says it is adultery.

Mark 10:11
And he saith unto them, Whosoever shall put away his wife, and marry another, committeth adultery against her.

Mark 10:12
And if a woman shall put away her husband, and be married to another, she committeth adultery.

Luke 16:18
Whosoever putteth away his wife, and marrieth another, committeth adultery: and whosoever marrieth her that is put away from her husband committeth adultery.
(This verse explicitly states if a man marries a woman that is put away (divorced) commits adultery.

Paul also clears it up for those who need a gentile example of divorce and remarriage
1 Corinthians 7:39
The wife is bound by the law as long as her husband liveth; but if her husband be dead, she is at liberty to be married to whom she will; only in the Lord.
(Notice if the husband is dead, and she can be married again but only in the Lord.)

Romans 7:2
For the woman which hath an husband is bound by the law to her husband so long as he liveth; but if the husband be dead, she is loosed from the law of her husband.

Romans 7:3
So then if, while her husband liveth, she be married to another man, she shall be called an adulteress: but if her husband be dead, she is free from that law; so that she is no adulteress, though she be married to another man.

1Corinthians 7:10
And unto the married I command, yet not I, but the Lord, Let not the wife depart from her husband:

1Corinthians 7:11
But and if she depart, let her remain unmarried or be reconciled to her husband: and let not the husband put away his wife.

1Corinthians 7:12
But to the rest speak I, not the Lord: If any brother hath a wife that believeth not, and she be pleased to dwell with him, let him not put her away.

1Corinthians 7:13
And the woman which hath an husband that believeth not, and if he be pleased to dwell with her, let her not leave him.

Notice that Pauls say in 7:12 "the rest speak I, not the Lord:" People will read into these verse and those preceding them to say Paul is giving room for remarriage because he says they are no longer under bondage. This isn't the case. Paul isn't one to make a statement from the Lord then contradict it a few verses later. When he says let a woman be reconciled back to that husband that is still what he means. If you read through chapter 7 you will see Paul giving examples to show if you are in a calling stay in that calling. The examples are: circumcised to uncircumcised and vise versa and he also points out if a servant be a servant don't be bothered about it, but he also says if you are free or become a freeman do it rather. The Lord needs freemen. So if a husband departs or a wife departs either be reconciled back to them or you stay single(no longer under that bondage) you are a freeman to do service to Christ only. No remarriage, it isn't even mentioned.

14 For the unbelieving husband is sanctified by the wife, and the unbelieving wife is sanctified by the husband: else were your children unclean; but now are they holy.

15 But if the unbelieving depart, let him depart. A brother or a sister is not under bondage in such cases: but God hath called us to peace.

16 For what knowest thou, O wife, whether thou shalt save thy husband? or how knowest thou, O man, whether thou shalt save thy wife?

17 But as God hath distributed to every man, as the Lord hath called every one, so let him walk. And so ordain I in all churches.

18 Is any man called being circumcised? let him not become uncircumcised. Is any called in uncircumcision? let him not be circumcised.

19 Circumcision is nothing, and uncircumcision is nothing, but the keeping of the commandments of God.

20Let every man abide in the same calling wherein he was called.

21 Art thou called being a servant? care not for it: but if thou mayest be made free, use it rather.

22 For he that is called in the Lord, being a servant, is the Lord's freeman: likewise also he that is called, being free, is Christ's servant.

23 Ye are bought with a price; be not ye the servants of men.

24 Brethren, let every man, wherein he is called, therein abide with God.
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  • Independent Fundamental Baptist

Agree, yet.

Ga 6:7 Be not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap

On this issue there be many that mock God, and pays not the least bit of attention to what He says about it, and or twist verses around to suit them.

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  • Lady Administrators

I just have to throw this in. I've mentioned it before, but here goes.

Polygamy is the practice of multiple marriages. Bigamy being a man with two wives (usually they don't know about each other), polygyny being a man with multiple wives (we generally state that it is polygamy, but actually polygamy is the umbrella under which all multiple marriages fall), polyandry being the practice of a woman with multiple husbands, polyamory the practice of multiple relationships that may or may not be married to each other.

Now, if we apply the idea that Paul is referencing the practice of polygyny (which is the more accurate term), we all would say that is just wrong, wrong, wrong. Because God didn't create five women for one man, right? (or vice versa, if it were polyandry, which it isn't since a woman can't be a pastor, right?). And so, we say without any hesitation that a man with multiple wives cannot pastor. Okay...

The problem with that is that it is kinda playing with semantics. It really is. Because we have this little thing called serial polygyny (also called serial monogamy). Yep. It exists. And I find it interesting that the secular world can identify it, but many Christians say, "that's downright silly." Here is what serial polygyny (or serial monogamy) is:
"a succession of short monogamous relationships (as by someone who undergoes multiple divorces)" and "The process of contracting several marriages in succession- marriage, divorce, and remarriage."

Yes. That is the world's definition. I find it interesting that the secular world can see that a series of marriage, divorce, remarriage, is polygynous, but Christians cannot, and therefore make excuses for the preachers who practice it. I'm sorry, but either way Paul intended the injunction for pastors to be the husbands of one wife means no divorce, remarriage in the pulpit.

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  • Independent Fundamental Baptist

The question, LuAnne, is this:

"Is divorce and remarriage ever acceptable in the eyes of God?"

If the answer is no, then a man can't be a pastor having been divorced because he has two living wives. Furthermore, everyone (pastor or not) who has been remarried is currently living in sin and is trapped into not being able to do anything about it (see post #49).

If the answer is yes, then it is possible for a man to be divorced and remarried without having sinned. If a man hasn't sinned then he is blameless before God and no one has any right to tell him otherwise or to declare him unfit to pastor. That would be putting a standard on him that is unbiblical and pharisaical.

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  • Lady Administrators

The question, LuAnne, is this:

"Is divorce and remarriage ever acceptable in the eyes of God?"

If the answer is no, then a man can't be a pastor having been divorced because he has two living wives. Furthermore, everyone (pastor or not) who has been remarried is currently living in sin and is trapped into not being able to do anything about it (see post #49).

If the answer is yes, then it is possible for a man to be divorced and remarried without having sinned. If a man hasn't sinned then he is blameless before God and no one has any right to tell him otherwise or to declare him unfit to pastor. That would be putting a standard on him that is unbiblical and pharisaical.


Rick, that might be your question, but it isn't that simple. Divorce and remarriage happen. They are a fact of life. One which God recognized via Moses, and one which Jesus addressed. I am not one that believes Jesus was merely referring to the Jewish betrothal period, simply because that betrothal period was in essence marriage, although unconsummated. And it was/is a direct picture of Christ and His church.

God had Paul write the qualifications for those who would lead His church. As has been noted, there are more qualifications than just marriage. And they are often overlooked, to the detriment of the flock.

However, we need to compare scripture to scripture, instead of applying man's reasoning.

Jesus said: "And I say unto you, Whosoever shall put away his wife, except it be for fornication, and shall marry another, committeth adultery: and whoso marrieth her which is put away doth commit adultery."

There are many good people who do not believe that Jesus intended that the exception clause here would mean that remarriage is possible. However, Jesus did put that "except" in there. And so, in reality, we cannot say He didn't mean it, right? The end phrase, "whoso marrieth her..." has the understanding that the woman was put away for fornication. Ergo, marrying the woman who was put would be committing adultery. The reverse would have to also be true (if a woman divorced a man for his adultery).

Now, this is where it evolves into simple opinion. IMO, because of the grace and mercy of God, I don't believe that He would condemn the innocent party of a divorce caused by adultery to permanent singlehood (although, depending on the age of the parties, it might be the wisest route...). But that is my opinion. Others don't think there should be any more remarriage at all (and there is some basis for this in Corinthians). So, on that basis, one could claim that a divorced, remarried man could remain in the pulpit (or one who was married to a divorced woman). But it is on the basis of opinion, not scripture.

However, God did have Paul say that one of the qualifications of a pastor is to be the husband of one wife. Not to be a polygynist...whether it be serially or all at the same time is a moot point. Yes, the divorce took place. But the CONSEQUENCES of that divorce are not removed, anymore than any other sin! And one of those consequences is that he should not pastor any more.

The man is the head of his home. Period. How is he leading properly if he does not deal with his wife's spiritual needs? If she is so lonely, or so headstrong, or so rebellious, that she goes out and has an affair, her husband has not loved her as he ought. And so, just as the pastor of a church answers to the Lord for the way he spiritually leads his flock, so, too, will the husband answer for the way he leads his wife and his home. And that would include if she leaves him...

As to being in continued adultery....I don't agree with that. I do believe that, when a couple realizes that their marriage began incorrectly (i.e. one or both was married before), and they seriously want to serve the Lord, they will go to the Lord and seek forgiveness. There is a movement on (it has been around for quite a while) that teaches that people who have been divorced and remarried must divorce their current spouse and remarry their first one. That is totally unbiblical. I know we are not under OT law, but God very emphatically tells us there (therefore placing a principle) that the woman who has remarried is not to return to her first husband - because it compounds the sin.

If a pastor goes out and gets sloppy drunk and gets into a bar fight and lands in jail, we'd be the first to say he needs to step down from the pulpit. Why? Because SIN HAS CONSEQUENCES. If a pastor's children are running around being sexually promiscuous, doing drugs, mugging people, we'd say that pastor needs to step down. Buuuuuuut....if the pastor has been divorced and remarried (and more than once, to boot), someone who believes they are disqualified because of what scripture says is considered Pharisaical by those who want him to remain in the pulpit. But there is no getting around it. God laid it down via Paul. A pastor is to be the husband of one wife. The man who is divorced and remarried is not. He has had two (or three) wives, and the first (and second) was not separated from him by death. That is disqualification.

And, as my parents' pastor says: we go on from there. Why do we, as a people, insist that a divorced, remarried man remain in the pulpit? Is that the only way to serve the Lord? Of course not! There is so much more out there, yet we defend men who remain in the pulpit. And wouldn't it be much better for Christianity (and the world, who, for pity's sake, watches and laughs when this kind of thing happens) if that pastor would humble himself, step down, admit he wasn't the kind of husband he should have been (gentlemen, I submit to you that if a man is TRULY loving his wife as he should, she won't consider any pastures greener...) and serve God in a non-pastoral manner. But, unfortunately, our very human pride gets in the way. And that is truly what a divorced man clinging to the pulpit is all about.
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  • Independent Fundamental Baptist

The question, LuAnne, is this:

"Is divorce and remarriage ever acceptable in the eyes of God?"

If the answer is no, then a man can't be a pastor having been divorced because he has two living wives. Furthermore, everyone (pastor or not) who has been remarried is currently living in sin and is trapped into not being able to do anything about it (see post #49).

If the answer is yes, then it is possible for a man to be divorced and remarried without having sinned. If a man hasn't sinned then he is blameless before God and no one has any right to tell him otherwise or to declare him unfit to pastor. That would be putting a standard on him that is unbiblical and pharisaical.



No, divorce is not acceptable to God.

Ge 2:24 Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife: and they shall be one flesh.

Yet we do have a God that is merciful and He will forgive. Yet there is always consequences to our sins. One consequence of a man divorcing is he cannot be a pastor of a New Testament Church.

To say that divorce is acceptable to God would be saying God accepts sin, He does not. I might add, God will forgive any sin when a person come to Him with a repenting heart.
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  • Independent Fundamental Baptist

Good post, sister. :)

The problem with it though, LuAnne, is that if you're going to say "husband of one wife" means "husband of one wife for life" then a lost divorced man who gets saved could never, ever be a pastor because of something that happened before he got saved. A man can be a fornicator or a drunk or in the case of Paul someone who actually tortured Christians, and he could hold the office of a deacon or a pastor once he was saved and showed the fruit of God in his life - but if he's divorced he's out for life, anywhere and everywhere on the face of the Earth from being a pastor OR a deacon. That's completely contrary to the word of God, everything is cleaned at salvation.

A young man gets saved and his wife leaves him three months later. Fifteen years later he still can't be a pastor OR deacon, regardless of what God has done in his life?

We can throw realistic but hypothetical situations and dictionary definitions out there all day, but in the end the only thing that matters is what the Bible says. It says "husband of one wife," if that means "one wife for life" then there's a myriad of ridiculous (and unbiblical) situations that would disqualify a man from being a deacon, let alone a pastor. That why I believe the only interpretation that is consistent with the rest of Scripture is "one wife now."

I'm not endorsing divorce, I am not divorced and neither is my pastor or anyone in our church's staff. I believe divorce is a terrible thing, but I only go so far as the Scripture goes when it comes to condemning it. If a man is sinless in divorce, and God does not assign any blame to him, I certainly am not going to either.

Edited by Rick Schworer
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  • Lady Administrators

Rick, I could almost agree to one single divorce and remarriage (almost, but that only counts in horse shoes and hand grenades :icon_mrgreen: ). But there is absolutely no justification for multiple divorces/remarriage. I know you aren't divorced, nor are your church leaders. And that is great. But, I do know that staying in the pulpit becomes a matter of pride for many divorced people.

We can argue til the moon turns blue, Rick. This is a very emotional subject for many people (especially in light of the burgeoning divorce rate in the pulpit), but, Rick, God says husband of one wife. Not one wife at a time.

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  • Independent Fundamental Baptist

Moses was not fit to lead Israel simply because he got mad and hit the rock instead of speaking to it. I suppose many they be that thinks it was foolish of God to disqualify Moses from leading Israel into the promise land even taking his life for what we would call a very minor disobedience.

Yes, human reasoning, wisdom, will cause people to think many of God's ways are quite foolish and that we humans knows a better way of doing all things than even God. Which is turning away surrendering our will to Him while trusting and obeying.

Yes, its sets a very good example for all to follow placing divorced men in the only two offices that Jesus set up in His New Testament Churches.

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