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John81

You're Confederate ... But Don't Know It?

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You're Confederate ... But Don't Know It?

by Charley Reese





Most of the political problems in this country won't be settled until more folks realize the South was right.

I know that goes against the P.C. edicts, but the fact is that on the subject of the constitutional republic, the Confederate leaders were right and the Northern Republicans were wrong.

Many people today even argue the Confederate positions without realizing it.

For example, if you argue for strict construction of the Constitution, you are arguing the Confederate position; when you oppose pork-barrel spending, you are arguing the Confederate position; and when you oppose protective tariffs, you are arguing the Confederate position. But that's not all.

When you argue for the Bill of Rights, you are arguing the Confederate position, and when you
argue that the Constitution limits the power and jurisdiction of the federal government, you are arguing the Confederate position.

One of the things that gets lost when you adopt the politically correct oversimplification that the War Between the States was a Civil War all about slavery is a whole treasure load of American political history.

It was not a civil war. A civil war is when two or more factions contend for control of one government. At no time did the South intend or attempt to overthrow the government of the United States. The Southern states simply withdrew from what they correctly viewed as a voluntary union. They formed their own union and adopted their own constitution.

The U.S. government remained intact. There were just fewer states, but everything else remained as exactly as it was. You can be sure that, with as much bitterness and hatred of the South that
there was in the North, the Northerners would have tried Confederates for treason if there had been any grounds. There weren't, and the South's worst enemy knew that.

Abraham Lincoln's invasion of the South was entirely without any constitutional authority. And it's as plain as an elephant in a tea party that Lincoln did not seek to preserve the Union to end slavery. All you have to do is read his first inaugural address. What Lincoln didn't want to lose was tax revenue generated by the South.

As Northern states gained a majority in both houses, they began to use the South as a cash cow. Here's how it worked: Most Southerners who exported cotton bartered the cotton in Europe for goods. When the protective tariffs were imposed, that meant Southerners had to pay them. To make matters worse, the North would then use the revenue for pork-barrel projects in its states. The South was faced with either paying
high tariffs and receiving no benefits from the revenue or buying artificially high-priced Northern goods.

Southerners opposed pork-barrel spending. Their correct view was that, because the federal government was merely the agent of all the states, whatever money it spent should be of equal benefit. Their position on public lands was that they belonged to all the people and the federal government had no authority to give the lands away to private interests.

Northerners had announced they would not be bound by the Constitution. What you had was the rise of modern nationalism fighting the original republic founded by the American Revolution.

So, regardless of where you were born, you may be a Southerner philosophically.

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:amen::amen::amen::goodpost:

I really wish more people would see the truth of the civil war. Lincoln wasn't so great.

Indeed. The Civil War was not, as most people probably now think, about slavery.
There are many misconceptions around that time in history amongst America's citizens.
God bless,
Crushmaster.

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by Charley Reese Most of the political problems in this country won't be settled until more folks realize the South was right. I know that goes against the P.C. edicts, but the fact is that on the subject of the constitutional republic, the Confederate leaders were right and the Northern Republicans were wrong. Many people today even argue the Confederate positions without realizing it. For example, if you argue for strict construction of the Constitution, you are arguing the Confederate position; when you oppose pork-barrel spending, you are arguing the Confederate position; and when you oppose protective tariffs, you are arguing the Confederate position. But that's not all. When you argue for the Bill of Rights, you are arguing the Confederate position, and when you argue that the Constitution limits the power and jurisdiction of the federal government, you are arguing the Confederate position. One of the things that gets lost when you adopt the politically correct oversimplification that the War Between the States was a Civil War all about slavery is a whole treasure load of American political history. It was not a civil war. A civil war is when two or more factions contend for control of one government. At no time did the South intend or attempt to overthrow the government of the United States. The Southern states simply withdrew from what they correctly viewed as a voluntary union. They formed their own union and adopted their own constitution. The U.S. government remained intact. There were just fewer states, but everything else remained as exactly as it was. You can be sure that, with as much bitterness and hatred of the South that there was in the North, the Northerners would have tried Confederates for treason if there had been any grounds. There weren't, and the South's worst enemy knew that. Abraham Lincoln's invasion of the South was entirely without any constitutional authority. And it's as plain as an elephant in a tea party that Lincoln did not seek to preserve the Union to end slavery. All you have to do is read his first inaugural address. What Lincoln didn't want to lose was tax revenue generated by the South. As Northern states gained a majority in both houses, they began to use the South as a cash cow. Here's how it worked: Most Southerners who exported cotton bartered the cotton in Europe for goods. When the protective tariffs were imposed, that meant Southerners had to pay them. To make matters worse, the North would then use the revenue for pork-barrel projects in its states. The South was faced with either paying high tariffs and receiving no benefits from the revenue or buying artificially high-priced Northern goods. Southerners opposed pork-barrel spending. Their correct view was that, because the federal government was merely the agent of all the states, whatever money it spent should be of equal benefit. Their position on public lands was that they belonged to all the people and the federal government had no authority to give the lands away to private interests. Northerners had announced they would not be bound by the Constitution. What you had was the rise of modern nationalism fighting the original republic founded by the American Revolution. So, regardless of where you were born, you may be a Southerner philosophically.

You're Confederate ... But Don't Know It?






































:amen: :goodpost:

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Slavery did have something to do with civil war. I mean look at gay marriages today.. Right now we have the state deciding who can marry or not.. but we are one step closer to getting the Fed to take over the state's decision.

We would argue that we just didn't want the fed to usurp the state's decision.
the fed want to get their hands on the state just so they could legalize gay marriage in every states. If the fed do take over the state, and IF people start a war over this (I am NOTsaying they should or will.. just saying "IF" ).. Down the line people would say this war was about gay marriages. Just like they say that civil war was about slavery.

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The reason the history books state that the Civil War was due to Southern support of the Institution of Slavery was due to the efforts of Mr. John Brown and a few other abolishionists ( http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/brown/timeline/index.html ) who wanted to wage a "Holy War" against slavery - which the ENTIRE country - not just the south - was in support of and benefited from socially and financially. Slaves were servants owned by the wealthy few aristocracy, not by common ordinary people.

If you want to read a history of the first shot fired of the Civil War, check this site out - it seems fairly accurate: http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/sumter.htm

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As in any war' date=' to the victor go the spoils.............quit your griping! :bonk:[/quote']

:lol::lol: :lol:

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The main thing that concerns me about confederacy is the idea of security...the smaller the area, the more vulnerable to outside forces and the more difficult trade and other things are.

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"Isaiah 8:12 Say ye not, A confederacy, to all them to whom this people shall say, A confederacy; neither fear ye their fear, nor be afraid."

Yes I know this verse has nothing to do with the civil war, posted for humor reasons only.

:Green

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"Isaiah 8:12 Say ye not' date=' A confederacy, to all them to whom this people shall say, A confederacy; neither fear ye their fear, nor be afraid."[/color']

Yes I know this verse has nothing to do with the civil war, posted for humor reasons only.

:Green


Don't worry, some very serious and pious poster will take offense by both your and my attempts at humor!

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John That's why we still refer to it as "The War of Northern Aggression" So well put! :clap: Pixiedust

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If you don't think the Confederacy had slavery at or near the top of their agenda, just read the Confederate constitution. And Lincoln didn't "invade" the South. We (I am a born and raised Georgian) fired on Fort Sumter (a Union fort), thus prompting a counter attack which led to all out war. Although several of the points that have been made are accurate, let's please not down play the role of slavery in the whole mess.

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Yeah, but Switzerland is not all that desirable a place to have, it's mainly the Alps. With that terrain to have to "take" who wants the headache. The only they have is Swiss Chocolate and Army Knives!

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If you don't think the Confederacy had slavery at or near the top of their agenda' date=' just read the Confederate constitution. And Lincoln didn't "invade" the South. We (I am a born and raised Georgian) fired on Fort Sumter (a Union fort), thus prompting a counter attack which led to all out war. Although several of the points that have been made are accurate, let's please not down play the role of slavery in the whole mess.[/quote']

It appears, many of us have accepted views from a secular perspective on the issue of our nation's "Civil War." I too was one of you, until I read about slavery, anti-slavery from the perspective of Christian history during the period.

The following are all excerpts from; A History of American Christianity, by Leonard Woolsey Bacon.

The enterprise of African colonization, already dear to Christian hearts for the hopes that it involved of the redemption of a lost continent, of the elevation of an oppressed race in America, of the emancipation of
slaves and the abolition of slavery, received a new consecration as the object of the dying labors and prayers of Mills. It was associated, in the minds of good men, not only with plans for the conversion of the heathen, and with the tide of antislavery sentiment now spreading and deepening both at the South and at the North, but also with "Clarkson societies" and other local organizations, in many different places, for the moral and physical elevation of the free colored people from the pitiable degradation in which they were commonly living in the larger towns. Altogether the watchmen on the walls of Zion saw no fairer sign of dawn, in that second decade of the nineteenth century, than the hopeful lifting of the cloud from Africa, the brightening prospects of the free negroes of the United States, and the growing hope of the abolition of American slavery.

In New England the focus of antislavery effort was perhaps the theological seminary at Andover. There the leading question among the students in their "Society of Inquiry concerning Missions"...The report of their committee, in the year 1823, on "The Condition of the Black Population of the United States," could hardly be characterized as timid in its utterances on the moral character of American slavery. A few lines will indicate the tone of it in this respect:

"Excepting only the horrible system of the West India Islands,
we have never heard of slavery in any country, ancient or
modern, pagan, Mohammedan, or Christian, so terrible in its
character, so pernicious in its tendency, so remediless in its
anticipated results, as the slavery which exists in these
United States...."

The disastrous epoch of the beginning of what has been called "the southern apostasy" from the universal moral sentiment of Christendom on the subject of slavery may be dated at about the year 1833.

When (about 1833) a Presbyterian minister in Mississippi, the Rev. James Smylie, made the "discovery," which "surprised himself," that the system of American slavery was sanctioned and approved by the
Scriptures as good and righteous, he found that his brethren in the Presbyterian ministry at the extreme South were not only surprised, but shocked and offended, at the proposition.[278:1] And yet such was the
swift progress of this innovation that in surprisingly few years, we might almost say months, it had become not only prevalent, but violently and exclusively dominant in the church of the southern States,...

How came the Christian public throughout the slave-holding States, which so short a time before had been unanimous in finding in the Bible the condemnation of their slavery, to find all at once in the Bible the
divine sanction and defense of it as a wise, righteous, and permanent institution?

But demonstrably the chief cause of this sudden change of religious opinion--one of the most remarkable in the history of the church--was panic terror. In August, 1831, a servile insurrection in Virginia, led by a crazy negro, Nat Turner by name, was followed (as always in such cases) by bloody vengeance on the part of the whites.

"The Southampton insurrection, occurring at a time when the
price of slaves was depressed in consequence of a depression
in the price of cotton, gave occasion to a sudden development
of opposition to slavery in the legislature of Virginia. A
measure for the prospective abolition of the institution in
that ancient commonwealth was proposed, earnestly debated,
eloquently urged, and at last defeated, with a minority
ominously large in its favor."

"The clergy and the religious bodies were summoned to the
patriotic duty of committing themselves on the side of
'southern institutions.' Just then it was, if we mistake not,
that their apostasy began."

"They yielded to the demand. They were carried along in the
current of the popular frenzy; they joined in the clamor,
'Great is Diana of the Ephesians;' they denounced the
fanaticism of abolition and permitted themselves to be
understood as certifying, in the name of religion and of
Christ, that the entire institution of slavery 'as it exists' is
chargeable with no injustice and is warranted by the word
of God."

...throughout the South a constraining power for the suppression of free speech, not only on the part of outsiders, but among the southern people themselves. The r

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If you don't think the Confederacy had slavery at or near the top of their agenda' date=' just read the Confederate constitution. And Lincoln didn't "invade" the South. We (I am a born and raised Georgian) fired on Fort Sumter (a Union fort), thus prompting a counter attack which led to all out war. Although several of the points that have been made are accurate, let's please not down play the role of slavery in the whole mess.[/quote']

Lincoln pushed for war while only seven States had seceeded. The firing upon Fort Sumter, while written in the history books as the beginning of the war, was not where it began. Shots were fired well before Sumter and Lincoln was aggressively pushing his war aims. Lincoln did indeed invade the South. Had he not invaded the South, there would have been no war.

One might also note that slavery was a subissue of the Consitutional crisis. The American Constitution had clear statements regarding slavery and congress had passed laws regarding slavery. The radical northern abolitionists continually pushed for the ignoring of the Constitution and congressional laws. This was both illegal and unconstitutional. The Constitution provides means for the amending of the Constitution and the changing of congressional laws but increasingly northern politicians determined they didn't have to abide by the law of the land.

That was one aspect of the Constitutional crises, another being tariffs, which northern politicians were pushing through in an unconstitutional manner.

I don't know anyone who denies that slavery was an issue, it simply wasn't the main issue. The main issue was whether or not the Union was going to be governed by the Constitution or by the whims of a newly emerging political majority.

Remember, slavery was legal according to the American Constitution and according to laws passed by Congress and was upheld by the Supreme Court of the United States. Remember also, the emerging new political majority could have used constitutional means to bring about the end of slavery, just as other nations did, rather than refusing to obey the law of the land.

It should also be noted the New England states several times had considered leaving the Union and there was no talk of the other Constitution-abiding states telling them they couldn't and threatening to force them to remain.

There was a strong and growing abolitionist movement in the South prior to The War. The main difference between the Southern abolitionist movement and the northern one was the Southern abolitionists looked to phase out slavery, just as other nations did, giving slaves the opportunity to learn and prepare for freedom while the northern abolitionists demanded an immediate forced end to slavery which would dump millions of unprepared slaves on the streets and cause economic chaos (which would eventually be seen after The War).

One might note the Bible does not condemn slavery nor call it a sin so I don't think the fact the South didn't prevail is any indication that God was against them because of slavery. One might consider The War and forced reunion as a punishment upon America as a whole which was already drifting from God at that time. Universalism and communistic ideas already had a foothold in America and during The War Lincoln imported tens of thousands of communistic and Catholic folks into America bringing further corruption.

A good book to read is "What Hath God Wrought" by Dr. Grady. It's mostly a history of America from an especially Baptist perspective.

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