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Easter Thoughts

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My Thoughts

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Easter Thoughts

Christians who still hold the Jewish people accountable in the role of Jesus' death are being transparently un-Christian and I don't mean merely in the sense that Jesus taught forgiveness, or that it's not nice to promote genocide, no matter how angry you might be. The point or at least one of the main points, of our religion is that Jesus died for humanity's sins. I recognize that just because the story had a theological happy ending doesn't mean that the Crucifixion was anything other than horrific. The symbol of our religion is the cross, not a Good Samaritan icon, because the Crucifixion and subsequent resurrection were what proved his divinity and redeemed humankind. It is clear that the Crucifixion and Resurrection are central to the Christian faith. While the Crucifixion in itself wasn't a good thing, it was, according to our Christian doctrine, an entirely necessary and pre-ordained thing. Without it, Christianity as we know it wouldn't exist.
We all wear and look at Crucifixes and I think maybe we have forgot just exactly why it’s our symbol, to give you a way to look at it, just think if Jesus had been hung instead of nailed to a cross, we would then have our jewelry in the shape of a hangman’s noose, doesn’t seem the same does it? I hope that the next time you put a Crucifix on or see a cross anywhere you remember just exactly the sacrifice that God gave for us, think about what the symbol means.
So, the answer to the question "Why did the Jews kill Jesus?" should be: No, and we shouldn’t hold The Jewish people accountable. I mean you can’t say any race or group of people did something that a few did, just as Americas can’t be grouped because some serial killer was American, nor can we say all Muslin’s & German’s are bad because of Homein & Hitler’s actions. Holding a race or group of people for the actions of a few is exactly what we are taught as Christians not to do. Theologically, the question is irrelevant, which means Christians can stop blaming Jews and people of both faiths can get back to disagreeing about things like whether you get more presents at Hanukkah or Christmas.
My meaning to this discussion is that when we critize one for their beliefs to the point that it is prestigious or hurtful we are being un-Christian. Jesus’ teachings does not instruct us to hate or be hurtful to others. So why do some think it is ok to do so.. There are no commandments or teachings that say we can’t befriend someone who has other beliefs than we do; in fact we are taught to do just the opposite. Do we ask to who and what faith are they when we drop our change into one of Salvation Army buckets at Christmas? When we see someone in need should we ask what faith they are before helping? Should we turn our backs on someone who is in need because they are homeless, owe us money, have done us wrong in the past or don’t go to the same Church or have the same beliefs as ourselves? Respect and do for others as you think Jesus would, it’s a simple concept so why is it so hard for some to do?
True Christians will someday, I hope, understand that our beliefs are rooted from childhood by our parents and the people around us and just because others were brought up in a different way, with different beliefs doesn’t mean all are wrong or not going to Heaven. There are thousands of different reglions and denomations based on The Bible and the only thing that all can really agree, other than there is a creator in God, is that all of us can’t be right. There is and will always be disagreement and different interpretations of the meanings and translations of the writings of the Bible; maybe it was God’s hand in the compilation of these books and text that keeps it interesting and discussed for over a 2000yrs now. If these text were written in such a simple way that there was no way for it to be interpreted except one way, it prOBably would have been read once as a youngster and then put on the bookshelf or in the storage box in the attic along with our 1st grade Dick & Jane book. I have to think in His ultimate wisdom ,God knows that by discussion and debate over the interpretations we keep His word alive and fresh to those who wish to believe in Him. I won’t go in to discussing other books and beliefs not based on The Bible at this time, a topic for another time, but know this , I do believe we are taught to love and understand ALL, not just those of us who were raised with the teachings from The Bible.
As we celebrate the resurrection of Christ we should maybe take a look within ourselves to resurrect our faith and love every one, no matter of race or reglion. Help those who are in need help and do as if The Lord is right there with you, for He is. Some are good at showing their beliefs, faith and religion by quoting or posting Bible verses on social networking sites, others do the things that make others aware of their faith by making sure they go to church service or work at events to assure everyone knows they were there. Then they live another way, causing turmoil, hurting the ones they are supposed to love, turning their backs on those in need, judging people on their looks, what they drive or what they do for a living or being prestigious towards people of different races or beliefs. It’s like putting your clothes in the dryer before you wash them, one is no good without the other, to be the whole Christian not only do we need to show our beliefs and faith but live by them too. The things we do that don’t get the recgonigation in the paper or church bulletin are the things we may be judged on the most.
In this Easter season we will all hear “Jesus died for you”, we also need to remember why Jesus lived for us.

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    • Thank you for uploading the sermon  by Pastor Vaughan. Both the sermon and the song, "While the Ages Roll," were a blessing.
    • When I was a teen, and he came to town, I often got drafted as a pianist for meetings-and following him when he was singing was just about impossible lol!  To this day, I can't sing or play "Come and Dine" at church without hearing his rendition of it in my head.  He was the real deal.  And he seemed to always travel with a huge cooler of what we would now call organic health food- he was way before the health food movement!  
    • The Lord blessed you. Bro. Roloff was a man of God. It would be an honour to have hosted Bro. Roloff in one's home as a guest. I listened to Roloff's, "Dr. Law and Dr. Grace," many years ago and enjoyed it immensely.
    • This sermon takes me back many years, to when Bro. Roloff was a guest in our home so often he had his own room.  Wonderful man with a great sense of humor.  If you find "Dr. Law and Dr. Grace", its worth listening to as well. 
    • Matt, Thank you for uploading the sermon by Lester Roloff, ""The Mule Walked On." Or, as a secondary title that brother Roloff says, "The Mule of Sin." The message on discipleship by brother Rofoff should be heard by all of the brethren on OnLineBaptist. The message by brother Roloff explains why there is a dearth of power in Christian homes today and in the pulpit of many churches. Among many of the great spiritual truths that Lester Roloff stated I think that his last thought is pertinent to all of us. "We are living in the day where everything rules the home but the husband and the Lord." Again, thanks. Alan  
    • John, I just finished listening to the sermon on Leviticus 18. I appreciate your boldness in proclaiming the truths of the moral obligations that God commanded to all men, in all countries, in all dispensations, as recorded in Leviticus 18. Alan  
    • I appreciate reading your summary of Leviticus 18. The same moral sins listed in the Law of the Old Testament, Leviticus 18 as one example, are still still an abomination in the sight of an Holy God. The immoral customs of the land of Egypt, the world, is not, repeat not, to do practiced among the saints in any dispensation or in any any country. "After the doings of the land of Egypt, wherein ye dwelt, shall ye not do: and after the doings of the land of Canaan, whither I bring you, shall ye not do: neither shall ye walk in their ordinances." Leviticus 18:3  The Apostle Paul stated, “And be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind, that ye may prove what is that good, and perfect, will of God.” Romans 12:2 When I have time I will listen to the full sermon.
    • John, Thank you very much for uploading this sermon on Leviticus 20. I do appreciate your devotion on holiness, sanctification and being godly in the sight of God. As you aptly brought out, the evil life style, and the abominations, of the heathen in the Old Testament is still evil and abominable in our society under the New Testament. As God abhorred the evil sexual acts, and the practices, of the world in the Old Testament so does God abhor the evil sexual acts in the New Testament. The message reminded me of 1 Corinthians 10:6, "Now these things were our examples, to the intent we should not lust after evil things, as they also lusted.” and Romans 15:4, “For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning, that we through patience and comfort of the scriptures might have hope. May the Lord bless you as you remind your congregation of the holiness of God, the wickedness of the customs and abominations of our society, and the sanctification of the righteous. Alan
    • A fine devotion. I especially enjoyed the quotation of Romans 8:15, "For ye have not received the spirit of bondage again to fear; but ye have received the Spirit of adoption, whereby we cry, Abba, Father."
    • John, I am glad to know that the devotion on Joseph and his Brethren was a blessing to you. Alan
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